Stability of Language and Literacy Profiles of Children With Language Impairment in the Public Schools Purpose The present study focused on the identification and stability of language and literacy profiles of primary school children receiving school-based language therapy over the course of one academic year. Method Participants included 272 early elementary school-age children (144 boys, 128 girls) who had been clinically identified as ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2015
Stability of Language and Literacy Profiles of Children With Language Impairment in the Public Schools
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sherine R. Tambyraja
    The Ohio State University, Crane Center for Early Childhood Research and Policy, Columbus. Mary Beth Schmitt is now at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, and Kelly Farquharson is now at Emerson College, Boston, MA
  • Mary Beth Schmitt
    The Ohio State University, Crane Center for Early Childhood Research and Policy, Columbus. Mary Beth Schmitt is now at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, and Kelly Farquharson is now at Emerson College, Boston, MA
  • Kelly Farquharson
    The Ohio State University, Crane Center for Early Childhood Research and Policy, Columbus. Mary Beth Schmitt is now at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, and Kelly Farquharson is now at Emerson College, Boston, MA
  • Laura M. Justice
    The Ohio State University, Crane Center for Early Childhood Research and Policy, Columbus. Mary Beth Schmitt is now at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, and Kelly Farquharson is now at Emerson College, Boston, MA
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Sherine R. Tambyraja: tambyraja.1@osu.edu
  • Editor: Rhea Paul
    Editor: Rhea Paul×
  • Associate Editor: Ann Tyler
    Associate Editor: Ann Tyler×
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2015
Stability of Language and Literacy Profiles of Children With Language Impairment in the Public Schools
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2015, Vol. 58, 1167-1181. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-L-14-0197
History: Received July 18, 2014 , Revised December 11, 2014 , Accepted April 19, 2015
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2015, Vol. 58, 1167-1181. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-L-14-0197
History: Received July 18, 2014; Revised December 11, 2014; Accepted April 19, 2015
Web of Science® Times Cited: 4

Purpose The present study focused on the identification and stability of language and literacy profiles of primary school children receiving school-based language therapy over the course of one academic year.

Method Participants included 272 early elementary school-age children (144 boys, 128 girls) who had been clinically identified as having a language impairment. A latent profile analysis was used to identify distinct profiles on the basis of a battery of language and literacy assessments in the fall and spring of the academic year.

Results Four profiles were identified in both fall and spring that could be best described as representing high, average, and low overall abilities. Two average groups were identified that differentiated according to phonological awareness abilities. Children's profile membership was variable from fall to spring with nearly 60% of children shifting into a higher profile. The results of t tests comparing children who shifted into higher profiles from those who remained stable in profile membership revealed group differences regarding language severity, socio-economic status, and proportion of therapy sessions received in the classroom.

Conclusion These results provide further evidence regarding the heterogeneity of children with language impairment served in the public schools, indicating that differences may be best conceptualized along a continuum of severity.

Acknowledgments
We would like to acknowledge the efforts of our project staff and research assistants, including Karie Wilson, Allison Alexander, Kate Fresh, and student coders. We are especially thankful to the SLPs, classroom teachers, families, and students who participated in this study. This research project was supported by Grant R324A090012 from the U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, to Laura M. Justice.
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