Effects of Hearing and Aging on Sentence-Level Time-Gated Word Recognition Purpose Aging is known to influence temporal processing, but its relationship to speech perception has not been clearly defined. To examine listeners' use of contextual and phonetic information, the Revised Speech Perception in Noise test (R-SPIN) was used to develop a time-gated word (TGW) task. Method In Experiment ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 2015
Effects of Hearing and Aging on Sentence-Level Time-Gated Word Recognition
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michelle R. Molis
    National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research, Portland VA Medical Center, OR
    Oregon Health & Science University, Portland
  • Sean D. Kampel
    National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research, Portland VA Medical Center, OR
  • Garnett P. McMillan
    National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research, Portland VA Medical Center, OR
  • Frederick J. Gallun
    National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research, Portland VA Medical Center, OR
    Oregon Health & Science University, Portland
  • Serena M. Dann
    National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research, Portland VA Medical Center, OR
  • Dawn Konrad-Martin
    National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research, Portland VA Medical Center, OR
    Oregon Health & Science University, Portland
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Michelle R. Molis: Michelle.Molis@va.gov
  • Portland VA Medical Center is now VA Portland Health Care System.
    Portland VA Medical Center is now VA Portland Health Care System.×
  • Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray
    Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray×
  • Associate Editor: Karen Kirk
    Associate Editor: Karen Kirk×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 2015
Effects of Hearing and Aging on Sentence-Level Time-Gated Word Recognition
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2015, Vol. 58, 481-496. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-H-14-0098
History: Received April 8, 2014 , Revised October 10, 2014 , Accepted November 21, 2014
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2015, Vol. 58, 481-496. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-H-14-0098
History: Received April 8, 2014; Revised October 10, 2014; Accepted November 21, 2014
Web of Science® Times Cited: 2

Purpose Aging is known to influence temporal processing, but its relationship to speech perception has not been clearly defined. To examine listeners' use of contextual and phonetic information, the Revised Speech Perception in Noise test (R-SPIN) was used to develop a time-gated word (TGW) task.

Method In Experiment 1, R-SPIN sentence lists were matched on context, target-word length, and median word segment length necessary for target recognition. In Experiment 2, TGW recognition was assessed in quiet and in noise among adults of various ages with normal hearing to moderate hearing loss. Linear regression models of the minimum word duration necessary for correct identification and identification failure rates were developed. Age and hearing thresholds were modeled as continuous predictors with corrections for correlations among multiple measurements of the same participants.

Results While aging and hearing loss both had significant impacts on task performance in the most adverse listening condition (low context, in noise), for most conditions, performance was limited primarily by hearing loss.

Conclusion Whereas hearing loss was strongly related to target-word recognition, the effect of aging was only weakly related to task performance. These results have implications for the design and evaluation of studies of hearing and aging.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation Research & Development Service Grants C7450R, C7113N, C6116W, C4963W, and the National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research. Thanks to Kelly Reavis, Roger Ellingson, and Patrick Tsukuda for their work on this project.
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