Auditory Learning in Children With Cochlear Implants Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine and characterize the training-induced changes in speech-in-noise perception in children with congenital deafness who have cochlear implants (CIs). Method Twenty-seven children with congenital deafness who have CIs were studied. Eleven children with CIs were trained on a speech-in-noise task, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2015
Auditory Learning in Children With Cochlear Implants
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Srikanta K. Mishra
    New Mexico State University, Las Cruces
  • Shiva P. Boddupally
    Shravya Speech & Hearing Center, Vengal Rao Nagar, Hyderabad, India
  • Deeksha Rayapati
    Shravya Speech & Hearing Center, Vengal Rao Nagar, Hyderabad, India
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Srikanta Mishra: smishra@nmsu.edu
  • Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray
    Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray×
  • Associate Editor: Richard Dowell
    Associate Editor: Richard Dowell×
Article Information
Development / Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2015
Auditory Learning in Children With Cochlear Implants
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2015, Vol. 58, 1052-1060. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-H-14-0340
History: Received December 4, 2014 , Revised January 29, 2015 , Accepted February 25, 2015
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2015, Vol. 58, 1052-1060. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-H-14-0340
History: Received December 4, 2014; Revised January 29, 2015; Accepted February 25, 2015

Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine and characterize the training-induced changes in speech-in-noise perception in children with congenital deafness who have cochlear implants (CIs).

Method Twenty-seven children with congenital deafness who have CIs were studied. Eleven children with CIs were trained on a speech-in-noise task, number recognition in white noise, at home for 5 weeks (total 40 hr). Speech recognition thresholds (SRTs) in the trained, partially trained (numbers in speech-shaped noise), and untrained (digit triplets in speech-shaped noise) conditions were measured before, immediately after, and 3 weeks after training completion. Data were also collected from children (n = 13) and adults (n = 5) with normal hearing for comparison.

Results Analyses indicated that following training, the performance of children with CIs improved for all speech-in-noise tasks (∆SRT was approximately 3 dB). Training-induced improvements in speech-in-noise performance were retained for 3 weeks following cessation of training. Untrained children with CIs showed no such improvements. The performance of children with CIs, even after intensive training, was significantly lower than children and adults with normal hearing.

Conclusions Training enhances speech-in-noise performance for children with congenital deafness who have CIs. Learning effects were stable and generalized to similar but untrained conditions. Current findings are encouraging for the consideration of home-based auditory training to be included in the pediatric CI habilitation programs.

Acknowledgments
We greatly appreciate the Emily Shannon Fu Foundation, Los Angeles, CA, for making the Angel Sound program available to us and thank Dr. Qian-Jie Fu, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, for providing important information regarding the software. We are grateful to all the participants and the parents of children with cochlear implants.
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