The Influence of Phonomotor Treatment on Word Retrieval Abilities in 26 Individuals With Chronic Aphasia: An Open Trial Purpose The ultimate goal of aphasia therapy should be to achieve gains in function that generalize to untrained exemplars and daily conversation. Anomia is one of the most disabling features of aphasia. The predominantly lexical/semantic approaches used to treat anomia have low potential for generalization due to the orthogonality of ... Research Article
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Research Article  |   June 01, 2015
The Influence of Phonomotor Treatment on Word Retrieval Abilities in 26 Individuals With Chronic Aphasia: An Open Trial
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Diane L. Kendall
    VA RR&D Puget Sound DVA Medical Center, Research Service, and University of Washington, Speech and Hearing Sciences, Seattle
  • Megan Oelke
    VA RR&D Puget Sound DVA Medical Center, Research Service, and University of Washington, Rehabilitation Medicine, Seattle
  • Carmel Elizabeth Brookshire
    VA RR&D Puget Sound DVA Medical Center, Research Service, and University of Washington, Speech and Hearing Sciences, Seattle
  • Stephen E. Nadeau
    Malcom Randall VA Medical Center, Gainesville, FL
    Research Service, Department of Neurology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Diane L. Kendall: dkendall@uw.edu
  • Editor: Rhea Paul
    Editor: Rhea Paul×
  • Associate Editor: Kristine Lundgren
    Associate Editor: Kristine Lundgren×
Article Information
Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2015
The Influence of Phonomotor Treatment on Word Retrieval Abilities in 26 Individuals With Chronic Aphasia: An Open Trial
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2015, Vol. 58, 798-812. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-L-14-0131
History: Received May 15, 2014 , Revised October 5, 2014 , Accepted January 10, 2015
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2015, Vol. 58, 798-812. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-L-14-0131
History: Received May 15, 2014; Revised October 5, 2014; Accepted January 10, 2015
Web of Science® Times Cited: 6

Purpose The ultimate goal of aphasia therapy should be to achieve gains in function that generalize to untrained exemplars and daily conversation. Anomia is one of the most disabling features of aphasia. The predominantly lexical/semantic approaches used to treat anomia have low potential for generalization due to the orthogonality of semantic and phonologic representations; this has been borne out in a meta-analysis of treatment studies. The intensive, neurally distributed, phonologic therapy reported here can, in principle, generalize to untrained phonologic sequences because of extant regularities in phonologic sequence knowledge and should, in principle, generalize to production of words trained as well as those untrained.

Method Twenty-six persons with chronic aphasia due to stroke were treated, in a staggered (immediate vs. delayed treatment) open trial design, with 60 hr of intensive, multimodal therapy designed to enhance access to and efficiency of phonemes and phonologic sequences.

Results There was an absolute increase of 5% in confrontation naming of “untrained” nouns at 3 months, and there were 9% to 10% increases on measures of generalization of phonologic processes.

Conclusion The results of this trial demonstrate generalization of training effects on laboratory measures, which were sustained at 3 months, and provide support for the theories that motivated the treatment.

Acknowledgments
The first and second authors were funded by VA RR&D Merit Review Grant C6572R. We acknowledge the participants and their families for their time and efforts. We also thank Samuel S. Wu for advice on computation of effect size thresholds. The contents of this publication do not represent the views of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs or the U.S. government.
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