The Effect of Voice Ambulatory Biofeedback on the Daily Performance and Retention of a Modified Vocal Motor Behavior in Participants With Normal Voices Purpose Ambulatory biofeedback has potential to improve carryover of newly established vocal motor behaviors into daily life outside of the clinic and warrants systematic research that is lacking in the literature. This proof-of-concept study was designed to establish an empirical basis for future work in this area by formally assessing ... Research Note
Research Note  |   June 01, 2015
The Effect of Voice Ambulatory Biofeedback on the Daily Performance and Retention of a Modified Vocal Motor Behavior in Participants With Normal Voices
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jarrad H. Van Stan
    MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston
  • Daryush D. Mehta
    MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston
    Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
  • Robert E. Hillman
    MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston
    Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
  • Disclosure: Robert E. Hillman has a financial interest in the APM based on a contractual agreement between Sensimetrics, Inc. (R&D for the initial version of the APM) and KayPENTAX, Inc. (manufacturer of the APM).
    Disclosure: Robert E. Hillman has a financial interest in the APM based on a contractual agreement between Sensimetrics, Inc. (R&D for the initial version of the APM) and KayPENTAX, Inc. (manufacturer of the APM).×
  • Correspondence to Jarrad Van Stan: jvanstan@mghihp.edu
  • Editor: Jody Kreiman
    Editor: Jody Kreiman×
  • Associate Editor: Scott Thomson
    Associate Editor: Scott Thomson×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Notes
Research Note   |   June 01, 2015
The Effect of Voice Ambulatory Biofeedback on the Daily Performance and Retention of a Modified Vocal Motor Behavior in Participants With Normal Voices
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2015, Vol. 58, 713-721. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-S-14-0159
History: Received June 10, 2014 , Revised October 20, 2014 , Accepted January 10, 2015
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2015, Vol. 58, 713-721. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-S-14-0159
History: Received June 10, 2014; Revised October 20, 2014; Accepted January 10, 2015

Purpose Ambulatory biofeedback has potential to improve carryover of newly established vocal motor behaviors into daily life outside of the clinic and warrants systematic research that is lacking in the literature. This proof-of-concept study was designed to establish an empirical basis for future work in this area by formally assessing whether ambulatory biofeedback reduces daily vocal intensity (performance) and the extent to which this change remains after biofeedback removal (retention).

Method Six participants with normal voices wore the KayPENTAX Ambulatory Phonation Monitor for 3 baseline days followed by 4 days with biofeedback provided on odd days.

Results Compared to baseline days, participants exhibited a statistically significant decrease in mean vocal intensity (4.4 dB) and an increase in compliance (16.8 percentage points) when biofeedback was provided above a participant-specific intensity threshold. After biofeedback removal, mean vocal intensity and compliance reverted back to baseline levels.

Conclusions These findings suggest that although current ambulatory biofeedback approaches have potential to modify a vocal motor behavior, the modified behavior may not be retained after biofeedback removal. Future work calls for the testing of more innovative ambulatory biofeedback approaches on the basis of motor control and learning theories to improve retention of a desired vocal motor behavior.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by the Voice Health Institute and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders under Grants R33 DC011588 and F31 DC014412. The article’s contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.
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