Articulatory-to-Acoustic Relations in Talkers With Dysarthria: A First Analysis Purpose The primary purpose of this study was to determine the strength of interspeaker and intraspeaker articulatory-to-acoustic relations of vowel contrast produced by talkers with dysarthria and controls. Methods Six talkers with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), six talkers with Parkinson's disease (PD), and 12 controls repeated a sentence ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2015
Articulatory-to-Acoustic Relations in Talkers With Dysarthria: A First Analysis
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Antje Mefferd
    Wichita State University, KS
  • Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Antje Mefferd, who is now at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN: antje.mefferd@vanderbilt.edu
  • Editor: Jody Kreiman
    Editor: Jody Kreiman×
  • Associate Editor: Julie Liss
    Associate Editor: Julie Liss×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Dysarthria / Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2015
Articulatory-to-Acoustic Relations in Talkers With Dysarthria: A First Analysis
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2015, Vol. 58, 576-589. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-S-14-0188
History: Received July 8, 2014 , Revised December 18, 2014 , Accepted January 18, 2015
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2015, Vol. 58, 576-589. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-S-14-0188
History: Received July 8, 2014; Revised December 18, 2014; Accepted January 18, 2015
Web of Science® Times Cited: 2

Purpose The primary purpose of this study was to determine the strength of interspeaker and intraspeaker articulatory-to-acoustic relations of vowel contrast produced by talkers with dysarthria and controls.

Methods Six talkers with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), six talkers with Parkinson's disease (PD), and 12 controls repeated a sentence at typical, slow, and fast rates. Tongue displacements and acoustic vowel distances were measured to determine articulatory and acoustic vowel contrasts.

Results Interspeaker articulatory-to-acoustic relations were strong for talkers with PD and controls but weak for talkers with ALS and controls. Further, predominantly moderate and strong intraspeaker articulatory-to-acoustic relations were found in response to rate modulations; however, correlation coefficients were significantly lower in talkers with ALS than in controls.

Conclusions The findings on interspeaker articulatory-to-acoustic relations suggested that the degree of tongue displacement can be accurately inferred from the degree of acoustic vowel contrast in talkers with PD but not in talkers with ALS. Findings on intraspeaker articulatory-to-acoustic relations generally supported the longstanding notion that speaking rate–induced changes in tongue displacement evoke similar changes in acoustic vowel contrast. Differential effects of the pathophysiology on inter- and intraspeaker articulatory-to-acoustic relations are discussed.

Acknowledgments
This work was funded by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation New Investigators Research Grant. Preliminary results were presented in November 2012 at the annual convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association in San Diego, CA, and in October 2012 at the Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America. A small portion of this data set served as the basis of a master's thesis completed by Stephanie Entz. I would like to thank all participants for their willingness to complete this study as well as Shana Gatschet and Dr. Bart Grelinger for their support with participant recruitment. Special thanks also to Sean Hess, Carol Hassebroek, Stephanie Entz, Emma Cerre, and Chelsea Nemeth for their excellent help with data collection and data analyses.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access