Metrical Encoding in Adults Who Do and Do Not Stutter Purpose The purpose of this study was to explore metrical aspects of phonological encoding (i.e., stress and syllable boundary assignment) in adults who do and do not stutter (AWS and AWNS, respectively). Method Participants monitored nonwords for target sounds during silent phoneme monitoring tasks across two distinct experiments. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2015
Metrical Encoding in Adults Who Do and Do Not Stutter
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Geoffrey A. Coalson
    Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge
  • Courtney T. Byrd
    The University of Texas at Austin
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Geoffrey A. Coalson: gcoals1@lsu.edu
  • Editor: Jody Kreiman
    Editor: Jody Kreiman×
  • Associate Editor: Hans-Georg Bosshardt
    Associate Editor: Hans-Georg Bosshardt×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2015
Metrical Encoding in Adults Who Do and Do Not Stutter
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2015, Vol. 58, 601-621. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-S-14-0111
History: Received April 22, 2014 , Revised October 21, 2014 , Accepted January 21, 2015
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2015, Vol. 58, 601-621. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-S-14-0111
History: Received April 22, 2014; Revised October 21, 2014; Accepted January 21, 2015
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose The purpose of this study was to explore metrical aspects of phonological encoding (i.e., stress and syllable boundary assignment) in adults who do and do not stutter (AWS and AWNS, respectively).

Method Participants monitored nonwords for target sounds during silent phoneme monitoring tasks across two distinct experiments. For Experiment 1, the 22 participants (11 AWNS, 11 AWS) silently monitored target phonemes in nonwords with initial stress. For Experiment 2, an additional cohort of 22 participants (11 AWNS, 11 AWS) silently monitored phonemes in nonwords with noninitial stress.

Results In Experiment 1, AWNS and AWS silently monitored target phonemes in initial stress stimuli with similar speed and accuracy. In Experiment 2, AWS demonstrated a within-group effect that was not present for AWNS. They required additional time when monitoring phonemes immediately following syllable boundary assignment in stimuli with noninitial stress. There was also a between-groups effect, with AWS exhibiting significantly greater errors identifying phonemes in nonwords with noninitial stress than AWNS.

Conclusions Findings suggest metrical properties may affect the time course of phonological encoding in AWS in a manner distinct from AWNS. Specifically, in the absence of initial stress, metrical encoding of the syllable boundary may delay speech planning in AWS and contribute to breakdowns in fluent speech production.

Acknowledgments
This project was supported by the ASHFoundation New Century Scholars Doctoral Scholarship awarded to the first author; the National Stuttering Association Canadeo Family Research Award with funding awarded to both authors; the Jesse H. Jones Fellowship awarded to the first author. Data collected at the Dr. Jennifer and Emanuel Bodner Developmental Stuttering Laboratory and the Michael and Tami Lang Stuttering Institute were supported by endowments awarded to the second author. We would like to thank Drs. Thomas Marquardt, Harvey Sussman, and Randy Diehl for their valuable input, Dr. Michael Mahometa for assistance during statistical analyses, and Elizabeth Rives and Chelsea Derouen for data processing and reliability efforts.
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