Intentional and Reactive Inhibition During Spoken-Word Stroop Task Performance in People With Aphasia Purpose The integrity of selective attention in people with aphasia (PWA) is currently unknown. Selective attention is essential for everyday communication, and inhibition is an important part of selective attention. This study explored components of inhibition—both intentional and reactive inhibition—during spoken-word production in PWA and in controls who were neurologically ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2015
Intentional and Reactive Inhibition During Spoken-Word Stroop Task Performance in People With Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rebecca Hunting Pompon
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Malcolm R. McNeil
    VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, PA
    University of Pittsburgh, PA
  • Kristie A. Spencer
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Diane L. Kendall
    University of Washington, Seattle
    VA Puget Sound Healthcare System, Seattle, WA
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Rebecca Hunting Pompon: rhpompon@uw.edu
  • Editor: Rhea Paul
    Editor: Rhea Paul×
  • Associate Editor: Robert Marshall
    Associate Editor: Robert Marshall×
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2015
Intentional and Reactive Inhibition During Spoken-Word Stroop Task Performance in People With Aphasia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2015, Vol. 58, 767-780. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-L-14-0063
History: Received February 21, 2014 , Revised June 25, 2014 , Accepted January 10, 2015
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2015, Vol. 58, 767-780. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-L-14-0063
History: Received February 21, 2014; Revised June 25, 2014; Accepted January 10, 2015
Web of Science® Times Cited: 2

Purpose The integrity of selective attention in people with aphasia (PWA) is currently unknown. Selective attention is essential for everyday communication, and inhibition is an important part of selective attention. This study explored components of inhibition—both intentional and reactive inhibition—during spoken-word production in PWA and in controls who were neurologically healthy (HC). Intentional inhibition is the ability to suppress a response to interference, and reactive inhibition is the delayed reactivation of a previously suppressed item.

Method Nineteen PWA and 20 age- and education-matched HC participated in a Stroop spoken-word production task. This task allowed the examination of intentional and reactive inhibition by evoking and comparing interference, facilitation, and negative priming effects in different contexts.

Results Although both groups demonstrated intentional inhibition, PWA demonstrated significantly more interference effects. PWA demonstrated no significant facilitation effects. HC demonstrated significant reverse facilitation effects. Neither group showed significant evidence of reactive inhibition, though both groups showed similar individual variability.

Conclusions These results underscore the challenge interference presents for PWA during spoken-word production, indicating diminished intentional inhibition. Although reactive inhibition was not different between PWA and HC, PWA showed difficulty integrating and adapting to contextual information during language tasks.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant F31DC012457, awarded to Rebecca Hunting Pompon. The authors acknowledge Amanda Hendricks, Hallie Mass, Erin McDonald, Leslie Yoo, and all participants for their contributions to this study.
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