Individual Monitoring of Vocal Effort With Relative Fundamental Frequency: Relationships With Aerodynamics and Listener Perception Purpose The acoustic measure relative fundamental frequency (RFF) was investigated as a potential objective measure to track variations in vocal effort within and across individuals. Method Twelve speakers with healthy voices created purposeful modulations in their vocal effort during speech tasks. RFF and an aerodynamic measure of vocal ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2015
Individual Monitoring of Vocal Effort With Relative Fundamental Frequency: Relationships With Aerodynamics and Listener Perception
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Yu-An S. Lien
    Boston University, MA
  • Carolyn M. Michener
    Boston University, MA
  • Tanya L. Eadie
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Cara E. Stepp
    Boston University, MA
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Yu-An S. Lien: slien@bu.edu
  • Editor: Jody Kreiman
    Editor: Jody Kreiman×
  • Associate Editor: Scott Thomson
    Associate Editor: Scott Thomson×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2015
Individual Monitoring of Vocal Effort With Relative Fundamental Frequency: Relationships With Aerodynamics and Listener Perception
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2015, Vol. 58, 566-575. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-S-14-0194
History: Received July 13, 2014 , Revised October 6, 2014 , Accepted January 9, 2015
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2015, Vol. 58, 566-575. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-S-14-0194
History: Received July 13, 2014; Revised October 6, 2014; Accepted January 9, 2015

Purpose The acoustic measure relative fundamental frequency (RFF) was investigated as a potential objective measure to track variations in vocal effort within and across individuals.

Method Twelve speakers with healthy voices created purposeful modulations in their vocal effort during speech tasks. RFF and an aerodynamic measure of vocal effort, the ratio of sound pressure level to subglottal pressure level, were estimated from the aerodynamic and acoustic signals. Twelve listeners also judged the speech samples for vocal effort using the visual sort and rate method.

Results Relationships between RFF and both the aerodynamic and perceptual measures of vocal effort were weak across speakers (R2 = .06–.26). Within speakers, relationships were variable but much stronger on average (R2 = .45–.56).

Conclusions RFF showed stronger relationships between both the aerodynamic and perceptual measures of vocal effort when examined within individuals versus across individuals. Future work is necessary to establish these relationships in individuals with voice disorders across the therapeutic process.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant DC012651 awarded to Cara E. Stepp. Thanks to Elizabeth Murray, Meredith Cler, Joseph Mendoza, and Felicia Patel for assistance with pilot vocal effort ratings and familiarization samples.
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