Environmental Sound Training in Cochlear Implant Users Purpose The study investigated the effect of a short computer-based environmental sound training regimen on the perception of environmental sounds and speech in experienced cochlear implant (CI) patients. Method Fourteen CI patients with the average of 5 years of CI experience participated. The protocol consisted of 2 pretests, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 2015
Environmental Sound Training in Cochlear Implant Users
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Valeriy Shafiro
    Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL
  • Stanley Sheft
    Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL
  • Sejal Kuvadia
    Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL
  • Brian Gygi
    Veterans Affairs Northern California Health Care System, Martinez, CA
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Valeriy Shafiro: valeriy_shafiro@rush.edu
  • Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray
    Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray×
  • Associate Editor: Richard Dowell
    Associate Editor: Richard Dowell×
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 2015
Environmental Sound Training in Cochlear Implant Users
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2015, Vol. 58, 509-519. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-H-14-0312
History: Received November 6, 2014 , Revised December 15, 2014 , Accepted December 16, 2014
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2015, Vol. 58, 509-519. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-H-14-0312
History: Received November 6, 2014; Revised December 15, 2014; Accepted December 16, 2014
Web of Science® Times Cited: 3

Purpose The study investigated the effect of a short computer-based environmental sound training regimen on the perception of environmental sounds and speech in experienced cochlear implant (CI) patients.

Method Fourteen CI patients with the average of 5 years of CI experience participated. The protocol consisted of 2 pretests, 1 week apart, followed by 4 environmental sound training sessions conducted on separate days in 1 week, and concluded with 2 posttest sessions, separated by another week without training. Each testing session included an environmental sound test, which consisted of 40 familiar everyday sounds, each represented by 4 different tokens, as well as the Consonant Nucleus Consonant (CNC) word test, and Revised Speech Perception in Noise (SPIN-R) sentence test.

Results Environmental sounds scores were lower than for either of the speech tests. Following training, there was a significant average improvement of 15.8 points in environmental sound perception, which persisted 1 week later after training was discontinued. No significant improvements were observed for either speech test.

Conclusions The findings demonstrate that environmental sound perception, which remains problematic even for experienced CI patients, can be improved with a home-based computer training regimen. Such computer-based training may thus provide an effective low-cost approach to rehabilitation for CI users, and potentially, other hearing impaired populations.

Acknowledgments
This work was funded by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant DC008676 awarded to Valeriy Shafiro. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health. We are grateful to all subjects with cochlear implants for their listening expertise, with a special thank you to the physicians and patients of the Chicago Ear Institute for their participation and encouragement.
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