The Efficacy of Stuttering Measurement Training: Evaluating Two Training Programs Purpose Two stuttering measurement training programs currently used for training clinicians were evaluated for their efficacy in improving the accuracy of total stuttering event counting. Method Four groups, each with 12 randomly allocated participants, completed a pretest–posttest design training study. They were evaluated by their counts of stuttering ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 2015
The Efficacy of Stuttering Measurement Training: Evaluating Two Training Programs
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lauren A. Bainbridge
    University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Candace Stavros
    University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Mineh Ebrahimian
    University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Yuedong Wang
    University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Roger J. Ingham
    University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Roger J. Ingham: rjingham@speech.ucsb.edu
  • Editor: Jody Kreiman
    Editor: Jody Kreiman×
  • Associate Editor: Hans-Georg Bosshardt
    Associate Editor: Hans-Georg Bosshardt×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 2015
The Efficacy of Stuttering Measurement Training: Evaluating Two Training Programs
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2015, Vol. 58, 278-286. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-S-14-0200
History: Received July 24, 2014 , Revised October 27, 2014 , Accepted January 16, 2015
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2015, Vol. 58, 278-286. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-S-14-0200
History: Received July 24, 2014; Revised October 27, 2014; Accepted January 16, 2015

Purpose Two stuttering measurement training programs currently used for training clinicians were evaluated for their efficacy in improving the accuracy of total stuttering event counting.

Method Four groups, each with 12 randomly allocated participants, completed a pretest–posttest design training study. They were evaluated by their counts of stuttering events on eight 3-min audiovisual speech samples from adults and children who stutter. Stuttering judgment training involved use of either the Stuttering Measurement System (SMS), Stuttering Measurement Assessment and Training (SMAAT) programs, or no training. To test for the reliability of any training effect, SMS training was repeated with the 4th group.

Results Both SMS-trained groups produced approximately 34% improvement, significantly better than no training or the SMAAT program. The SMAAT program produced a mixed result.

Conclusions The SMS program was shown to produce a “medium” effect size improvement in the accuracy of stuttering event counts, and this improvement was almost perfectly replicated in a 2nd group. Half of the SMAAT judges produced a 36% improvement in accuracy, but the other half showed no improvement. Additional studies are needed to demonstrate the durability of the reported improvements, but these positive effects justify the importance of stuttering measurement training.

Acknowledgments
The study was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant DC007893, awarded to R. J. Ingham, and a grant from the Undergraduate Research Committee at the University of California, Santa Barbara, awarded to C. Stavros and M. Ebrahimian. Special thanks are offered to Anne Bothe for her comments and edits on earlier versions of this article. We also thank Dan Orias for assistance with various parts of this study.
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