Face-Referenced Measurement of Perioral Stiffness and Speech Kinematics in Parkinson's Disease Purpose Perioral biomechanics, labial kinematics, and associated electromyographic signals were sampled and characterized in individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) as a function of medication state. Method Passive perioral stiffness was sampled using the OroSTIFF system in 10 individuals with PD in a medication ON and a medication OFF ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 2015
Face-Referenced Measurement of Perioral Stiffness and Speech Kinematics in Parkinson's Disease
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Shin Ying Chu
    National Rehabilitation Center for Persons with Disabilities, Saitama, Japan
  • Steven M. Barlow
    Center for Brain, Biology and Behavior, Communication Neuroscience Laboratories, University of Nebraska, Lincoln
  • Jaehoon Lee
    Institute for Measurement, Methodology, Analysis and Policy, Texas Tech University, Lubbock
  • Disclosure: Steven M. Barlow is the inventor of the OroSTIFF medical device which is registered and licensed by the University of Kansas to Epic Medical Concepts & Innovations, Incorporated (Mission, KS). There are no additional conflicts of interest with any of the commercial manufacturers mentioned in this article.
    Disclosure: Steven M. Barlow is the inventor of the OroSTIFF medical device which is registered and licensed by the University of Kansas to Epic Medical Concepts & Innovations, Incorporated (Mission, KS). There are no additional conflicts of interest with any of the commercial manufacturers mentioned in this article.×
  • Correspondence to Shin Ying Chu: chu-shinying@rehab.go.jp
  • Editor: Jody Kreiman
    Editor: Jody Kreiman×
  • Associate Editor: Kate Bunton
    Associate Editor: Kate Bunton×
Article Information
Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 2015
Face-Referenced Measurement of Perioral Stiffness and Speech Kinematics in Parkinson's Disease
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2015, Vol. 58, 201-212. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-S-13-0293
History: Received October 25, 2013 , Revised March 17, 2014 , Accepted December 3, 2014
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2015, Vol. 58, 201-212. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-S-13-0293
History: Received October 25, 2013; Revised March 17, 2014; Accepted December 3, 2014

Purpose Perioral biomechanics, labial kinematics, and associated electromyographic signals were sampled and characterized in individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) as a function of medication state.

Method Passive perioral stiffness was sampled using the OroSTIFF system in 10 individuals with PD in a medication ON and a medication OFF state and compared to 10 matched controls. Perioral stiffness, derived as the quotient of resultant force and interoral angle span, was modeled with regression techniques. Labial movement amplitudes and integrated electromyograms from select lip muscles were evaluated during syllable production using a 4-D computerized motion capture system.

Results Multilevel regression modeling showed greater perioral stiffness in patients with PD, consistent with the clinical correlate of rigidity. In the medication-OFF state, individuals with PD manifested greater integrated electromyogram levels for the orbicularis oris inferior compared to controls, which increased further after consumption of levodopa.

Conclusions This study illustrates the application of biomechanical, electrophysiological, and kinematic methods to better understand the pathophysiology of speech motor control in PD.

Acknowledgments
This article is based on a dissertation submitted by the first author in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of doctor of philosophy in speech-language-hearing sciences and disorders from the University of Kansas. This study was supported in part by the Sutherland Foundation and by National Institutes of Health Grants NIH R01 DC003311, NIH R01 DE13814, and NIH P30 DC005803, awarded to Rice. We would like to acknowledge the guidance and input of Jingyan Wang, Douglas Kieweg, Meredith Harold, Rajesh Pahwa, Kelly Lyons, and John Clark.
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