Reliability and Validity of the Computerized Revised Token Test: Comparison of Reading and Listening Versions in Persons With and Without Aphasia Purpose This study assessed the reliability and validity of intermodality associations and differences in persons with aphasia (PWA) and healthy controls (HC) on a computerized listening and 3 reading versions of the Revised Token Test (RTT; McNeil & Prescott, 1978). Method Thirty PWA and 30 HC completed the ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 2015
Reliability and Validity of the Computerized Revised Token Test: Comparison of Reading and Listening Versions in Persons With and Without Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Malcolm R. McNeil
    Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, PA
    University of Pittsburgh, PA
  • Sheila R. Pratt
    Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, PA
    University of Pittsburgh, PA
  • Neil Szuminsky
    Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, PA
    University of Pittsburgh, PA
  • Jee Eun Sung
    Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, PA
    University of Pittsburgh, PA
  • Tepanta R. D. Fossett
    Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, PA
    University of Pittsburgh, PA
  • Wiltrud Fassbinder
    Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, PA
    University of Pittsburgh, PA
  • Kyoung Yuel Lim
    Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, PA
    University of Pittsburgh, PA
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Malcolm R. McNeil: mcneil@pitt.edu
  • Jee Eun Sung is now at Ewha Womans University, Seoul, South Korea. Tepanta R. D. Fossett is now at Indiana University, Bloomington. Kyoung Yuel Lim is now at University of Texas–El Paso.
    Jee Eun Sung is now at Ewha Womans University, Seoul, South Korea. Tepanta R. D. Fossett is now at Indiana University, Bloomington. Kyoung Yuel Lim is now at University of Texas–El Paso.×
  • Editor: Rhea Paul
    Editor: Rhea Paul×
  • Associate Editor: Jessica Richardson
    Associate Editor: Jessica Richardson×
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 2015
Reliability and Validity of the Computerized Revised Token Test: Comparison of Reading and Listening Versions in Persons With and Without Aphasia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2015, Vol. 58, 311-324. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-L-13-0030
History: Received January 30, 2013 , Revised November 12, 2013 , Accepted October 30, 2014
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2015, Vol. 58, 311-324. doi:10.1044/2015_JSLHR-L-13-0030
History: Received January 30, 2013; Revised November 12, 2013; Accepted October 30, 2014
Web of Science® Times Cited: 3

Purpose This study assessed the reliability and validity of intermodality associations and differences in persons with aphasia (PWA) and healthy controls (HC) on a computerized listening and 3 reading versions of the Revised Token Test (RTT; McNeil & Prescott, 1978).

Method Thirty PWA and 30 HC completed the test versions, including a complete replication. Reading versions varied according to stimulus presentation method: (a) full-sentence presentation, (b) self-paced word-by-word full-sentence construction, and (c) self-paced word-by-word presentation with each word removed with the onset of the next word. Participants also received tests of aphasia and reading severity.

Results The listening version produced higher overall mean scores than each of the reading versions. Differences were small and within 1 standard error of measurement of each version. Overall score test–retest reliability among versions for PWA ranged from r = .89 to r = .97. Correlations between the listening and reading versions ranged from r = .79 to r = .85. All versions correlated highly with aphasia and reading severity. Correlations were generally low for the HC due to restricted variability. Factor analysis yielded a 2-factor solution for PWA and a single-factor for HC.

Conclusions Intermodality differences were small, and all 4 versions were reliable, concurrently valid, and sensitive to similar linguistic processing difficulties in PWA.

Acknowledgments
The previously published test on which this research is based is derived from McNeil and Prescott (1978),  and those data are based on work supported in part by the VA Hospital, Denver, CO. Additional support for the work reported here are based in part on funding supplied by the Department of Veterans Affairs, Veterans Health Administration, Office of Research and Development, Rehabilitation Research and Development Service (award #C47074X to Malcolm R. McNeil and award #C3118R to Patrick J. Doyle and Sheila R. Pratt), and resources and facilities provided by the Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center in the Veterans Affairs Pittsburgh Healthcare System, PA. The contents of this article do not represent the views of the Department of Veterans Affairs or the U.S. Government.
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