Benefits of Music Training in Mandarin-Speaking Pediatric Cochlear Implant Users Purpose The aims of this study were to assess young (5- to 10-year-old) Mandarin-speaking cochlear implant (CI) users' musical pitch perception and to assess the benefits of computer-based home training on performance. Method Melodic contour identification (MCI) was used to assess musical pitch perception in 14 Mandarin-speaking pediatric ... Research Note
Research Note  |   February 01, 2015
Benefits of Music Training in Mandarin-Speaking Pediatric Cochlear Implant Users
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Qian-Jie Fu
    Signal Processing and Auditory Research Laboratory, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles
  • John J. Galvin, III
    Signal Processing and Auditory Research Laboratory, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles
  • Xiaosong Wang
    Signal Processing and Auditory Research Laboratory, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles
  • Jiunn-Liang Wu
    National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Qian-Jie Fu: qfu@mednet.ucla.edu
  • Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray
    Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray×
  • Associate Editor: Richard Dowell
    Associate Editor: Richard Dowell×
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Hearing / Research Note
Research Note   |   February 01, 2015
Benefits of Music Training in Mandarin-Speaking Pediatric Cochlear Implant Users
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2015, Vol. 58, 163-169. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-H-14-0127
History: Received May 9, 2014 , Revised July 22, 2014 , Accepted September 11, 2014
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2015, Vol. 58, 163-169. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-H-14-0127
History: Received May 9, 2014; Revised July 22, 2014; Accepted September 11, 2014
Web of Science® Times Cited: 5

Purpose The aims of this study were to assess young (5- to 10-year-old) Mandarin-speaking cochlear implant (CI) users' musical pitch perception and to assess the benefits of computer-based home training on performance.

Method Melodic contour identification (MCI) was used to assess musical pitch perception in 14 Mandarin-speaking pediatric CI users; the instrument timbre and the contour length were varied as experimental parameters. Six subjects received subsequent MCI training on their home computer in which auditory and visual feedback were provided.

Results MCI performance was generally poor (grand mean = 33.3% correct) and highly variable, with scores ranging from 9.3% to 98.1% correct; there was no significant effect of instrument timbre or contour length on performance (p > .05). After 4 weeks of training, performance sharply improved. Follow-up measures that were conducted 8 weeks after training was stopped showed no significant decline in MCI performance. For the 6 trained subjects, there was a significant effect of contour length for the training and follow-up measures.

Conclusion These preliminary data suggest that although baseline MCI performance initially may be poor, training may greatly improve Mandarin-speaking pediatric CI users' melodic pitch perception.

Acknowledgments
This research was partially supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant R01-DC004792, awarded to the first author. We are grateful to the research subjects and their families for their considerable time and effort spent with this project.
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