Veridical and False Recall in Adults Who Stutter Purpose This study used a false memory paradigm to explore the veridical and false recall of adults who stutter. Method Twelve adults who stutter and 12 age-matched typically fluent peers listened to and then verbally recalled lists of words that consisted of either semantic or phonological associates or ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2015
Veridical and False Recall in Adults Who Stutter
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Courtney T. Byrd
    The University of Texas at Austin
  • Li Sheng
    The University of Texas at Austin
  • Nan Bernstein Ratner
    University of Maryland, College Park
  • Zoi Gkalitsiou
    The University of Texas at Austin
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Courtney T. Byrd: courtneybyrd@mail.utexas.edu
  • Editor: Jody Kreiman
    Editor: Jody Kreiman×
  • Associate Editor: Hans-Georg Bosshardt
    Associate Editor: Hans-Georg Bosshardt×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2015
Veridical and False Recall in Adults Who Stutter
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2015, Vol. 58, 28-42. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-S-13-0301
History: Received November 2, 2013 , Revised March 30, 2014 , Accepted September 22, 2014
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2015, Vol. 58, 28-42. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-S-13-0301
History: Received November 2, 2013; Revised March 30, 2014; Accepted September 22, 2014
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose This study used a false memory paradigm to explore the veridical and false recall of adults who stutter.

Method Twelve adults who stutter and 12 age-matched typically fluent peers listened to and then verbally recalled lists of words that consisted of either semantic or phonological associates or an equal number of semantic and phonological associates (i.e., hybrid condition) of a single, unpresented critical “lure” word. Three parameters of recall performance were measured across these 3 conditions: (a) number of accurately recalled words, (b) order of recall (primacy vs. recency effect), and (c) number of critical lures produced (i.e., false memories).

Results Significant group differences were noted in recall accuracy specific to list type and also list position as well as relative to critical lure productions.

Conclusions Results suggest that certain basic memory processes (i.e., recency effect) and the processing of gist semantic information are largely intact in adults who stutter, but recall of verbatim phonological information and subvocal rehearsal may be deficient.

Acknowledgments
We would like to acknowledge the endowed support provided by the Michael and Tami Lang Stuttering Institute and the Jennifer and Emanuel Bodner Developmental Stuttering Laboratory. We would also like to thank Elizabeth Hampton, who assisted us with the recruitment and testing of participants, as well as graduate students Ladaun Jackson and Amy Delahoussaye, who assisted with the testing, transcription, and data-coding process. We would also like to thank Michael Mahometa for his assistance with the statistical analyses. Most of all, we would like to thank the adults who do and do not stutter who were willing to give their time to participate in this study and help us to further our knowledge of the underlying nature of stuttering.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access