Stability of the Medial Olivocochlear Reflex as Measured by Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess the repeatability of a fine-resolution, distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE)–based assay of the medial olivocochlear (MOC) reflex in normal-hearing adults. Method Data were collected during 36 test sessions from 4 normal-hearing adults to assess short-term stability and 5 normal-hearing ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2015
Stability of the Medial Olivocochlear Reflex as Measured by Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Srikanta K. Mishra
    House Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA
  • Carolina Abdala
    House Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA
  • Carolina Abdala is now at the Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles.
    Carolina Abdala is now at the Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles.×
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Srikanta K. Mishra, who is now at New Mexico State University, Las Cruces: smishra@nmsu.edu
  • Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray
    Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray×
  • Associate Editor: Suzanne Purdy
    Associate Editor: Suzanne Purdy×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2015
Stability of the Medial Olivocochlear Reflex as Measured by Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2015, Vol. 58, 122-134. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-H-14-0013
History: Received January 14, 2014 , Revised May 5, 2014 , Accepted September 18, 2014
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2015, Vol. 58, 122-134. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-H-14-0013
History: Received January 14, 2014; Revised May 5, 2014; Accepted September 18, 2014
Web of Science® Times Cited: 3

Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess the repeatability of a fine-resolution, distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE)–based assay of the medial olivocochlear (MOC) reflex in normal-hearing adults.

Method Data were collected during 36 test sessions from 4 normal-hearing adults to assess short-term stability and 5 normal-hearing adults to assess long-term stability. DPOAE level and phase measurements were recorded with and without contralateral acoustic stimulation. MOC reflex indices were computed by (a) noting contralateral acoustic stimulation-induced changes in DPOAE level (both absolute and normalized) at fine-structure peaks, (b) recording the effect as a vector difference, and (c) separating DPOAE components and considering a component-specific metric.

Results Analyses indicated good repeatability of all indices of the MOC reflex in most frequency ranges. Short- and long-term repeatability were generally comparable. Indices normalized to a subject's own baseline fared best, showing strong short- and long-term stability across all frequency intervals.

Conclusions These results suggest that fine-resolution DPOAE-based measures of the MOC reflex measured at strategic frequencies are stable, and natural variance from day-to-day or week-to-week durations is small enough to detect between-group differences and possibly to monitor intervention-related success. However, this is an empirical question that must be directly tested to confirm its utility.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant R01 DC003552, awarded to the second author, and the House Research Institute. We thank Ping Luo for technical assistance and Laurel Fisher for assistance with statistical analysis. Portions of this study were presented at the annual meeting of the American Auditory Society, Scottsdale, Arizona, March 3–5, 2011.
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