Individual Differences in Susceptibility to the McGurk Effect: Links With Lipreading and Detecting Audiovisual Incongruity Purpose Prior studies (e.g., Nath & Beauchamp, 2012) report large individual variability in the extent to which participants are susceptible to the McGurk effect, a prominent audiovisual (AV) speech illusion. The current study evaluated whether susceptibility to the McGurk effect (MGS) is related to lipreading skill and whether multiple measures ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2014
Individual Differences in Susceptibility to the McGurk Effect: Links With Lipreading and Detecting Audiovisual Incongruity
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Julia Strand
    Carleton College, Northfield, MN
  • Allison Cooperman
    Carleton College, Northfield, MN
  • Jonathon Rowe
    Carleton College, Northfield, MN
  • Andrea Simenstad
    Carleton College, Northfield, MN
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to: jstrand@carleton.edu
  • Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray
    Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray×
  • Associate Editor: Kathleen Cienkowski
    Associate Editor: Kathleen Cienkowski×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 2014
Individual Differences in Susceptibility to the McGurk Effect: Links With Lipreading and Detecting Audiovisual Incongruity
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2014, Vol. 57, 2322-2331. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-H-14-0059
History: Received February 18, 2014 , Revised July 2, 2014 , Accepted September 19, 2014
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2014, Vol. 57, 2322-2331. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-H-14-0059
History: Received February 18, 2014; Revised July 2, 2014; Accepted September 19, 2014
Web of Science® Times Cited: 3

Purpose Prior studies (e.g., Nath & Beauchamp, 2012) report large individual variability in the extent to which participants are susceptible to the McGurk effect, a prominent audiovisual (AV) speech illusion. The current study evaluated whether susceptibility to the McGurk effect (MGS) is related to lipreading skill and whether multiple measures of MGS that have been used previously are correlated. In addition, it evaluated the test–retest reliability of individual differences in MGS.

Method Seventy-three college-age participants completed 2 tasks measuring MGS and 3 measures of lipreading skill. Fifty-eight participants returned for a 2nd session (approximately 2 months later) in which MGS was tested again.

Results The current study demonstrated that MGS shows high test–retest reliability and is correlated with some measures of lipreading skill. In addition, susceptibility measures derived from identification tasks were moderately related to the ability to detect instances of AV incongruity.

Conclusions Although MGS is often cited as a demonstration of AV integration, the results suggest that perceiving the illusion depends in part on individual differences in lipreading skill and detecting AV incongruity. Therefore, individual differences in susceptibility to the illusion are not solely attributable to individual differences in AV integration ability.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported in part by a grant from Howard Hughes Medical Institute to Carleton College Interdisciplinary Science and Math Initiative (Grant 52006286). We are grateful to Paul Mains and Harper Makowsky for assistance with data collection and to Sarah Meerts, Julie Neiworth, Joseph Slote, and two anonymous reviewers for helpful feedback on earlier versions.
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