Technical Advances Toward an Endoscopic–Phototransducer Approach to Investigation of Velopharyngeal Physiology Purpose This study aimed to examine the response characteristics of a new generation phototransducer and to test new recording and processing procedures when used with endoscopy to track velopharyngeal closure during normal speech. Method Integrated phototransducer–endoscopy response linearity was laboratory tested using a wide range of simulated velopharyngeal ... Research Note
Research Note  |   December 01, 2014
Technical Advances Toward an Endoscopic–Phototransducer Approach to Investigation of Velopharyngeal Physiology
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michael Karnell
    University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • Jerald Moon
    University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Michael Karnell: michael-karnell@uiowa.edu
  • Editor: Jody Kreiman
    Editor: Jody Kreiman×
  • Associate Editor: Kate Bunton
    Associate Editor: Kate Bunton×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Note
Research Note   |   December 01, 2014
Technical Advances Toward an Endoscopic–Phototransducer Approach to Investigation of Velopharyngeal Physiology
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2014, Vol. 57, 2152-2161. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-S-14-0027
History: Received January 28, 2014 , Revised May 19, 2014 , Accepted July 22, 2014
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2014, Vol. 57, 2152-2161. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-S-14-0027
History: Received January 28, 2014; Revised May 19, 2014; Accepted July 22, 2014
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose This study aimed to examine the response characteristics of a new generation phototransducer and to test new recording and processing procedures when used with endoscopy to track velopharyngeal closure during normal speech.

Method Integrated phototransducer–endoscopy response linearity was laboratory tested using a wide range of simulated velopharyngeal orifice areas. In vivo speech testing was completed to determine the effect of endoscope to light receptor distance on measurements documenting variations in normal velopharyngeal closure.

Results Phototransducer response linearity was excellent (r = .99) provided an indirect (reflected light) orientation was used between the endoscope and the light-sensing fiber coupled with the phototransducer. Phototransducer response time exceeded expected velopharyngeal movement rates by an order of magnitude. In vivo speech measurements were affected by the distance between the light-emitting endoscope and the light-receiving tip of the light-sensing fiber. Data normalization to a light-out condition effectively controlled for this expected phenomenon. Patterns of velopharyngeal valving during speech were found to be stable and appropriate given the phonetic content of the utterance.

Conclusions Technological and data-processing advances support further exploration of an integrated phototransducer–endoscopic approach to studying velopharyngeal closure for speech. Additional studies involving normal speakers are under way.

Acknowledgments
We thank Kengo Nakajima and research assistants Kelsey Kruse and Elleen Riordan for their assistance. This research was funded in part by the University of Iowa Foundation Hughlett L. Morris Research Fund.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access