Psychobiological Stress Reactivity and Personality in Persons With High and Low Stressor-Induced Extralaryngeal Reactivity Purpose The purpose of the study was to determine whether persons who responded with high stressor-induced extralaryngeal muscle activity in a stress reactivity protocol differed from those with low muscle activity on measures of emotional and autonomic cardiovascular reactivity and personality. Method Thirty-six vocally healthy women (18–35 years) ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2014
Psychobiological Stress Reactivity and Personality in Persons With High and Low Stressor-Induced Extralaryngeal Reactivity
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Maria Dietrich
    University of Missouri, Columbia
  • Katherine Verdolini Abbott
    University of Pittsburgh, PA
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Maria Dietrich: dietrichm@health.missouri.edu
  • Editor: Jody Kreiman
    Editor: Jody Kreiman×
  • Associate Editor: Miriam van Mersbergen
    Associate Editor: Miriam van Mersbergen×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 2014
Psychobiological Stress Reactivity and Personality in Persons With High and Low Stressor-Induced Extralaryngeal Reactivity
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2014, Vol. 57, 2076-2089. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-S-12-0386
History: Received December 2, 2012 , Revised July 30, 2013 , Accepted July 10, 2014
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2014, Vol. 57, 2076-2089. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-S-12-0386
History: Received December 2, 2012; Revised July 30, 2013; Accepted July 10, 2014

Purpose The purpose of the study was to determine whether persons who responded with high stressor-induced extralaryngeal muscle activity in a stress reactivity protocol differed from those with low muscle activity on measures of emotional and autonomic cardiovascular reactivity and personality.

Method Thirty-six vocally healthy women (18–35 years) were assigned to high and low extralaryngeal groups based on submental (SM) and infrahyoid (IH) surface electromyography (sEMG) recordings obtained during a stress reactivity protocol (high vs. low sEMGSM and sEMGIH, n = 18 per subgroup; Dietrich & Verdolini Abbott, 2012). Measures included assessments of basic fear and fear of public speaking, rumination, systolic blood pressure (SBP), and personality.

Results The high sEMGIH group reported significantly greater basic fear across experimental phases than did the low sEMGIH group (p = .036). However, the high sEMGSM and sEMGIH versus low sEMGSM and sEMGIH groups did not differ on fear of public speaking, rumination, or SBP across phases. Both high sEMGSM and sEMGIH groups were characterized by significantly lower scores on Extraversion (p < .001).

Conclusion In combination with the authors' previous findings (Dietrich & Verdolini Abbott, 2012), the present findings provided robust evidence that low Extraversion was linked to stressor-induced changes in extralaryngeal functioning and that perceived fear played a contributing role.

Acknowledgments
The study was funded by University of Pittsburgh School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Research Development Funds to Maria Dietrich and Katherine Verdolini Abbott. The authors thank Tanja Schultz and Szu-Chen (Stan) Jou, Carnegie Mellon University/Technische Universität Karlsruhe, Pittsburgh Mind Body Center; J. R. Jennings and A. L. Marsland, Departments of Psychology and Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh; and Rebecca Bird, Caitlin Hughes, Nicole Li, Chaya Nanjundeswaran, Rina Patel, April Scott, Adrianna Shembel, Michelle Sokolsky, Shuba Sriram, and Katherine White.
This study was completed at the University of Pittsburgh as partial fulfillment of Maria Dietrich's PhD degree requirements.
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