Acoustic and Perceptual Effects of Left–Right Laryngeal Asymmetries Based on Computational Modeling Purpose Computational modeling was used to examine the consequences of 5 different laryngeal asymmetries on acoustic and perceptual measures of vocal function. Method A kinematic vocal fold model was used to impose 5 laryngeal asymmetries: adduction, edge bulging, nodal point ratio, amplitude of vibration, and starting phase. Thirty ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 2014
Acoustic and Perceptual Effects of Left–Right Laryngeal Asymmetries Based on Computational Modeling
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Robin A. Samlan
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Brad H. Story
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Andrew J. Lotto
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Kate Bunton
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Robin A. Samlan: rsamlan@email.arizona.edu
  • Editor: Katherine Verdolini Abbott
    Editor: Katherine Verdolini Abbott×
  • Associate Editor: Scott Thomson
    Associate Editor: Scott Thomson×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 2014
Acoustic and Perceptual Effects of Left–Right Laryngeal Asymmetries Based on Computational Modeling
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2014, Vol. 57, 1619-1637. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-S-12-0405
History: Received December 18, 2012 , Revised September 6, 2013 , Accepted April 11, 2014
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2014, Vol. 57, 1619-1637. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-S-12-0405
History: Received December 18, 2012; Revised September 6, 2013; Accepted April 11, 2014
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose Computational modeling was used to examine the consequences of 5 different laryngeal asymmetries on acoustic and perceptual measures of vocal function.

Method A kinematic vocal fold model was used to impose 5 laryngeal asymmetries: adduction, edge bulging, nodal point ratio, amplitude of vibration, and starting phase. Thirty /a/ and /ɪ/ vowels were generated for each asymmetry and analyzed acoustically using cepstral peak prominence (CPP), harmonics-to-noise ratio (HNR), and 3 measures of spectral slope (H1*-H2*, B0-B1, and B0-B2). Twenty listeners rated voice quality for a subset of the productions.

Results Increasingly asymmetric adduction, bulging, and nodal point ratio explained significant variance in perceptual rating (R 2 = .05, p < .001). The same factors resulted in generally decreasing CPP, HNR, and B0-B2 and in increasing B0-B1. Of the acoustic measures, only CPP explained significant variance in perceived quality (R 2 = .14, p < .001). Increasingly asymmetric amplitude of vibration or starting phase minimally altered vocal function or voice quality.

Conclusion Asymmetries of adduction, bulging, and nodal point ratio drove acoustic measures and perception in the current study, whereas asymmetric amplitude of vibration and starting phase demonstrated minimal influence on the acoustic signal or voice quality.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by National Institutes of Health Grant F31-DC011201. We would like to acknowledge Mark Borgstrom's contributions to the statistical analysis.
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