Development of Joint Engagement in Young Deaf and Hearing Children: Effects of Chronological Age and Language Skills Purpose To evaluate joint engagement (JE) in age-matched children with and without hearing and its relationship to oral language skills. Method Participants were 180 children with severe-to-profound hearing loss prior to cochlear implant surgery, and 96 age-matched children with normal hearing; all parents were hearing. JE was evaluated ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 2014
Development of Joint Engagement in Young Deaf and Hearing Children: Effects of Chronological Age and Language Skills
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ivette Cejas
    The Barton G. Kids Hear Now Cochlear Implant Family Resource Center, University of Miami Ear Institute, FL
  • David H. Barker
    The Bradley Hasbro Children's Research Center Rhode Island Hospital/Alpert Medical School, Brown University, Providence, RI
  • Alexandra L. Quittner
    University of Miami, FL
  • John K. Niparko
    Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California, Los Angeles
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Ivette Cejas: icejas@med.miami.edu
  • Editor: Rhea Paul
    Editor: Rhea Paul×
  • Associate Editor: Jenny Roberts
    Associate Editor: Jenny Roberts×
Article Information
Development / Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 2014
Development of Joint Engagement in Young Deaf and Hearing Children: Effects of Chronological Age and Language Skills
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2014, Vol. 57, 1831-1841. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-L-13-0262
History: Received September 27, 2013 , Revised February 14, 2014 , Accepted May 17, 2014
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2014, Vol. 57, 1831-1841. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-L-13-0262
History: Received September 27, 2013; Revised February 14, 2014; Accepted May 17, 2014

Purpose To evaluate joint engagement (JE) in age-matched children with and without hearing and its relationship to oral language skills.

Method Participants were 180 children with severe-to-profound hearing loss prior to cochlear implant surgery, and 96 age-matched children with normal hearing; all parents were hearing. JE was evaluated in a 10-minute videotaped free play task with parents. Engagement states ranged from the lowest (unengaged) to the highest level (symbol-infused coordinated). Standardized language measures were administered.

Results Multivariate analyses were conducted between the groups, stratified by chronological and language age. Children who were deaf (Deaf) spent less time in total symbol-infused JE than children with normal hearing (NH) across all ages. The majority of the Deaf group (83%) fell in the lowest language age group, in comparison to 35% of the NH group, and spent significantly less time in symbol-infused JE than hearing children. These delays were also observed in the Deaf group, who fell into the 18-36 month language age. No children in the Deaf group had achieved a language age of > 36 months.

Conclusions Young children with and without hearing had different developmental trajectories of JE, which were related to oral language skills.

Acknowledgments
The CDaCI Study was supported by Grant R01 DC004797 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, the CityBridge Foundation, and the Sidgmore Family Foundation. Warranties on the implant devices used by children with implants in this study were discounted by 50% by the Advanced Bionics Corporation, Cochlear Corporation, and the MEDEL Corporation.
CDaCI Investigative Team: House Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA: Laurie S. Eisenberg, PhD, CCC-A (PI); Karen Johnson, PhD, CCC-A (coordinator); William Luxford, MD (surgeon); Leslie Visser-Dumont, MA, CCC-A (data collection); Amy Martinez, MA, CCC-A (data collection); Dianne Hammes Ganguly, MA (data collection); Jennifer Still, MHS (data collection); Carren J. Stika, PhD (data collection). Johns Hopkins University, Listening Center, Baltimore, MD: Howard Francis, MD (PI); Steve Bowditch, MS, CCC-A (data collection); Rick Ostrander, EdD (data collection); Jennifer Yeagle, MEd, CCC-A (data collection); Dawn Marsiglia, MA, CCC-A/SLP (data collection); Jill Stephens. Johns Hopkins University, The River School, Washington, DC: Nancy Mellon, MS (administration); Meredith Ouellette, MS (coordinator); Meredith Dougherty, MS (data collection); Patricia Gates-Ulanet, PhD (data collection); Julie Verhoff, AuD, CCC-A (data collection). University of Miami, FL: Annelle Hodges, PhD, CCC-A (PI); Thomas Balkany, MD (surgeon); Ivette Cejas, PhD (co-investigator); Alina Lopez, MA, CCC-SLP/A (coordinator); Leslie Goodwin, MSN, CCRC (data collection). University of Michigan, Ann Arbor: Teresa Zwolan, PhD, CCC-A (Principal Investigator); Caroline Arnedt, MA, CCC-A (clinic coordinator); Hussam El-Kashlam, MD (surgeon); Kelly Starr, MA, CCC-SLP (data collection); Ellen Thomas, MA, CCC-SLP, Cert AVT. University of North Carolina, Carolina Children's Communicative Disorders Program, Chapel Hill: Holly F. B. Teagle, AuD, CCC-A (PI); Craig A. Buchman, MD (surgeon); Carlton Zdanski, MD (surgeon); Hannah Eskridge, MSP (data collection); Harold C. Pillsbury, MD (surgeon); Jennifer Woodard (coordinator). University of Southern California, Los Angeles: John K. Niparko, MD (Study PI). University of Texas at Dallas, Dallas Cochlear Implant Program, Callier Advanced Hearing Research Center: Emily A. Tobey, PhD, CCC-SLP (Co-PI); Ann Geers, PhD (Co-PI); Lana Britt, AuD (Coordinator); Janet Lane, MS, CCC-SLP (data collection); Peter Roland, MD (surgeon); Sujin Shin, MA (data collection); Madhu Sundarrajan, MS, CCC-SLP (data collection).
Resource centers: Data Coordinating Center, Johns Hopkins University, Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology & Clinical Research, Baltimore: Nae-Yuh Wang, PhD (Co-PI, biostatistician); Christine M. Carson, ScM (Co-PI, study manager); Thelma Grace (data assembly); Patricia Bayton (data assembly). Psychometrics Center, University of Miami, Department of Psychology, Coral Gables, FL: Alexandra Quittner, PhD (PI); David Barker, PhD (data analysis); Ivette Cejas, PhD (Co-investigator); Michael Hoffman (data assembly).
Study oversight committees: Executive Committee: John K. Niparko, MD (chair); Laurie S. Eisenberg, PhD; Alexandra L. Quittner, PhD; Emily A. Tobey, PhD; Ann Geers, PhD; Nae-Yuh Wang, PhD; Christine M. Carson, ScM.
External advisors: Karen Iler Kirk, PhD; Mabel Rice, PhD; Donna Thal, PhD.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access