Dynamic Range for Speech Materials in Korean, English, and Mandarin: A Cross-Language Comparison Purpose The purpose of this study was to identify whether differences in dynamic range (DR) are evident across the spoken languages of Korean, English, and Mandarin. Method Recorded sentence-level speech materials were used as stimuli. DR was quantified using different definitions of DR (defined as the range in decibels ... Research Note
Research Note  |   October 01, 2014
Dynamic Range for Speech Materials in Korean, English, and Mandarin: A Cross-Language Comparison
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • In-Ki Jin
    University of Colorado, Boulder
  • James M. Kates
    University of Colorado, Boulder
  • Kathryn H. Arehart
    University of Colorado, Boulder
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to In-Ki Jin: in.jin@colorado.edu
  • Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray
    Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray×
  • Associate Editor: Todd Ricketts
    Associate Editor: Todd Ricketts×
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Hearing / Research Note
Research Note   |   October 01, 2014
Dynamic Range for Speech Materials in Korean, English, and Mandarin: A Cross-Language Comparison
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2014, Vol. 57, 2024-2030. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-H-14-0002
History: Received January 6, 2014 , Revised March 27, 2014 , Accepted April 22, 2014
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2014, Vol. 57, 2024-2030. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-H-14-0002
History: Received January 6, 2014; Revised March 27, 2014; Accepted April 22, 2014
Web of Science® Times Cited: 2

Purpose The purpose of this study was to identify whether differences in dynamic range (DR) are evident across the spoken languages of Korean, English, and Mandarin.

Method Recorded sentence-level speech materials were used as stimuli. DR was quantified using different definitions of DR (defined as the range in decibels from the highest to the lowest signal intensities), for several integration times (from 1 to 512 ms) and in different frequency bands (center frequencies [CFs] ranging from 150 to 8600 Hz).

Results Across the 3 languages, DR was affected in similar ways with regard to changes in DR definition and integration time. In contrast, across-language differences in DR were evident when considering frequency-band effects. Specifically, the DR for Korean was smaller than the English DR and the Mandarin DR in low-frequency bands (less than the CF of 455 Hz). Compared with Korean and Mandarin, the DR for English was smallest in mid-frequency bands (between the CF of 455 Hz and 4050 Hz) and was greatest in high-frequency bands (above the CF of 4050 Hz).

Conclusion The observed differences in DR across languages suggest that the best-fit DR for Korean and Mandarin may be different than the best fit for English.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported by a grant to the University of Colorado from GN ReSound. The authors thank Sig Soli for providing Korean speech materials, Dongmei Wang for providing information about the Mandarin language, and Chas Pavlovic for providing information about the original work for the SII.
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