Group Lidcombe Program Treatment for Early Stuttering: A Randomized Controlled Trial Purpose This study adds to the Lidcombe Program evidence base by comparing individual and group treatment of preschoolers who stutter. Method A randomized controlled trial of 54 preschoolers was designed to establish whether group delivery outcomes were not inferior to the individual model. The group arm used a rolling ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 2014
Group Lidcombe Program Treatment for Early Stuttering: A Randomized Controlled Trial
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Simone Arnott
    University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • Mark Onslow
    University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Sue O'Brian
    University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Ann Packman
    University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Mark Jones
    University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
  • Susan Block
    La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Mark Onslow: mark.onslow@sydney.edu.au
  • Simone Arnott is now at the School of Allied Health, Australian Catholic University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
    Simone Arnott is now at the School of Allied Health, Australian Catholic University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.×
  • Editor: Jody Kreiman
    Editor: Jody Kreiman×
  • Associate Editor: Hans-Georg Bosshardt
    Associate Editor: Hans-Georg Bosshardt×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 2014
Group Lidcombe Program Treatment for Early Stuttering: A Randomized Controlled Trial
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2014, Vol. 57, 1606-1618. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-S-13-0090
History: Received April 10, 2013 , Revised November 5, 2013 , Accepted April 2, 2014
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2014, Vol. 57, 1606-1618. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-S-13-0090
History: Received April 10, 2013; Revised November 5, 2013; Accepted April 2, 2014
Web of Science® Times Cited: 5

Purpose This study adds to the Lidcombe Program evidence base by comparing individual and group treatment of preschoolers who stutter.

Method A randomized controlled trial of 54 preschoolers was designed to establish whether group delivery outcomes were not inferior to the individual model. The group arm used a rolling group model, in which a new member entered an existing group each time a vacancy became available. Assessments were conducted prerandomization and 9 months and 18 months postrandomization.

Results There was no evidence of a difference between treatment arms for measures of weeks or clinic visits required, percent syllables stuttered, or parent severity ratings. However, children in the group arm consumed around half the number of speech-language pathologist hours compared with children treated individually. In addition, children in the group progressed more quickly after the treating speech-language pathologist became more practiced with the group model, suggesting the group results are conservative estimates.

Conclusions Group delivery of the Lidcombe Program is an efficacious alternative to the individual model. Parents responded favorably to the group model, and the treating speech-language pathologists found group treatment to be more taxing but clinically gratifying.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by Program Grant 633007 from the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia. We acknowledge the contribution of Jane Pruys for treatment of participants at La Trobe Communication Clinic.
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