Effects of Consecutive Wideband Tympanometry Trials on Energy Absorbance Measures of the Middle Ear Purpose Wideband acoustic immittance (WAI) is a new technique for assessing middle ear transfer function. It includes energy absorbance (EA) measures and can be acquired with the ear canal pressure varied, known as wideband tympanometry (WBTymp). The authors of this study aimed to investigate effects of consecutive WBTymp testing on ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 2014
Effects of Consecutive Wideband Tympanometry Trials on Energy Absorbance Measures of the Middle Ear
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Laina M. Burdiek
    Wichita State University, Wichita, Kansas
  • Xiao-Ming Sun
    Wichita State University, Wichita, Kansas
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Xiao-Ming Sun: xiao-ming.sun@wichita.edu
  • Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray
    Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray×
  • Associate Editor: Todd Ricketts
    Associate Editor: Todd Ricketts×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 2014
Effects of Consecutive Wideband Tympanometry Trials on Energy Absorbance Measures of the Middle Ear
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2014, Vol. 57, 1997-2004. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-H-13-0344
History: Received December 30, 2013 , Revised April 8, 2014 , Accepted April 30, 2014
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2014, Vol. 57, 1997-2004. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-H-13-0344
History: Received December 30, 2013; Revised April 8, 2014; Accepted April 30, 2014
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose Wideband acoustic immittance (WAI) is a new technique for assessing middle ear transfer function. It includes energy absorbance (EA) measures and can be acquired with the ear canal pressure varied, known as wideband tympanometry (WBTymp). The authors of this study aimed to investigate effects of consecutive WBTymp testing on EA.

Method Data were collected in 29 young adults with normal hearing and middle ear status. Before and after 8 successive WBTymp runs, EA was also measured at ambient pressure. Subsequently, two 226-Hz tympanometry tests were performed.

Results EA systematically changed over the WBTymp trials in a frequency-specific manner: increase for low frequencies (below 1.5 kHz) and decrease for high frequencies (around 2 kHz and 5 to 6 kHz). The changes, although small, were significant. Much larger EA changes were measured at ambient pressure. The test–retest difference of 226-Hz tympanogram measures was much smaller than previously reported.

Conclusion Consecutive tympanometry testing alters EA measures of the middle ear. This phenomenon could be mainly attributed to change in stiffness at the eardrum, called tympanometric preconditioning. This also has effects on baseline WBTymp outcomes. This effect should be taken into account as a procedural variable in both research and clinical applications of WAI measurements.

Acknowledgments
The Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Wichita State University supported Laina M. Burdiek's doctorate of audiology research project in the form of a graduate assistantship. Preliminary accounts of this work were presented at the 10th Annual Capitol Graduate Research Summit (Topeka, KS, February 2013), at the American Academy of Auditory Annual Convention (Anaheim, CA, April 2013), and at the 9th Annual Symposium on Graduate Research and Scholarly Projects (Wichita State University, April 2013).
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