A Transactional Model of Spoken Vocabulary Variation in Toddlers With Intellectual Disabilities Purpose The authors examined (a) whether dose frequency of milieu communication teaching (MCT) affects children's canonical syllabic communication and (b) whether the relation between early canonical syllabic communication and later spoken vocabulary is mediated by parental linguistic mapping in children with intellectual disabilities (ID). Method The authors drew on ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 2014
A Transactional Model of Spoken Vocabulary Variation in Toddlers With Intellectual Disabilities
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Tiffany Woynaroski
    Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
  • Paul J. Yoder
    Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
  • Marc E. Fey
    University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City
  • Steven F. Warren
    University of Kansas, Lawrence
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Tiffany Woynaroski: tiffany.g.woynaroski@vanderbilt.edu
  • Editor: Rhea Paul
    Editor: Rhea Paul×
  • Associate Editor: Stephanie Stokes
    Associate Editor: Stephanie Stokes×
Article Information
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 2014
A Transactional Model of Spoken Vocabulary Variation in Toddlers With Intellectual Disabilities
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2014, Vol. 57, 1754-1763. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-L-13-0252
History: Received September 17, 2013 , Revised January 29, 2014 , Accepted March 10, 2014
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2014, Vol. 57, 1754-1763. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-L-13-0252
History: Received September 17, 2013; Revised January 29, 2014; Accepted March 10, 2014
Web of Science® Times Cited: 4

Purpose The authors examined (a) whether dose frequency of milieu communication teaching (MCT) affects children's canonical syllabic communication and (b) whether the relation between early canonical syllabic communication and later spoken vocabulary is mediated by parental linguistic mapping in children with intellectual disabilities (ID).

Method The authors drew on extant data from a recent differential treatment intensity study in which 63 toddlers with ID were randomly assigned to receive either five 1-hr MCT sessions per week (i.e., daily treatment) or one 1-hr MCT session per week (i.e., weekly treatment) for 9 months. Children's early canonical syllabic communication was measured after 3 months of treatment, and later spoken vocabulary was measured at posttreatment. Midpoint parental linguistic mapping was measured after 6 months of treatment.

Results A moderate-sized effect in favor of daily treatment was observed on canonical syllabic communication. The significant relation between canonical syllabic communication and spoken vocabulary was partially mediated by linguistic mapping.

Conclusions These results suggest that canonical syllabic communication may elicit parental linguistic mapping, which may in turn support spoken vocabulary development in children with ID. More frequent early intervention boosted canonical syllabic communication, which may jump-start this transactional language-learning mechanism. Implications for theory, research, and practice are discussed.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant R01DC007660, National Institute on Child Health and Human Development Grant P30 NICHD HD 002528, and U.S. Department of Education Grant H325D080075. We acknowledge the significant contributions of Jayne Brandel, Catherine Bush, Debby Daniels, Elizabeth Gardner, Nicole Thompson, and Peggy Waggoner.
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