Effect of Posttraumatic Stress on Study Time in a Task Measuring Four Component Processes Underlying Text-Level Reading Purpose To investigate the effect of combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on 4 components underlying text-level reading comprehension. Method A group of 17 veterans with PTSD and 17 matched control participants took part. An experimental task required participants to read and study 3-sentence paragraphs describing semantic features associated ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 2014
Effect of Posttraumatic Stress on Study Time in a Task Measuring Four Component Processes Underlying Text-Level Reading
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michael P. Sullivan
    Portland VA Medical Center, Oregon Health & Science University
  • Gina G. Griffiths
    University of Oregon, Eugene
  • Mckay Moore Sohlberg
    University of Oregon, Eugene
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Michael P. Sullivan: sullivan@ohsu.edu
  • Editor: Rhea Paul
    Editor: Rhea Paul×
  • Associate Editor: Robert Marshall
    Associate Editor: Robert Marshall×
Article Information
Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 2014
Effect of Posttraumatic Stress on Study Time in a Task Measuring Four Component Processes Underlying Text-Level Reading
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2014, Vol. 57, 1731-1739. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-L-13-0238
History: Received September 4, 2013 , Revised December 2, 2013 , Accepted March 10, 2014
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2014, Vol. 57, 1731-1739. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-L-13-0238
History: Received September 4, 2013; Revised December 2, 2013; Accepted March 10, 2014
Web of Science® Times Cited: 2

Purpose To investigate the effect of combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on 4 components underlying text-level reading comprehension.

Method A group of 17 veterans with PTSD and 17 matched control participants took part. An experimental task required participants to read and study 3-sentence paragraphs describing semantic features associated with real and unreal objects. Each paragraph was followed by true–false statements that assessed knowledge access, text memory, inference, and integration.

Results The results revealed that the PTSD group took significantly longer than the control group to study the paragraphs. Although there was no group difference in test statement accuracy, the PTSD group also took significantly longer to respond to the test statements.

Conclusions Overall, the results provide evidence for the control theory of attention but suggest that more direct measures of task-irrelevant processing during text-level reading are needed. More important, the results begin to lay a foundation for developing not only diagnostic but also intervention strategies.

Acknowledgment
This work was supported by National Science Foundation Grant 1012947.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access