Triadic Gaze Intervention for Young Children With Physical Disabilities Purpose This randomized controlled study investigated whether a supplemental treatment designed to teach triadic gaze (TG) as a signal of coordinated joint attention would yield a significantly greater increase in TG in the experimental versus control group. Method Eighteen 10- to 24-month-old children with severe motor impairments were randomly ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 2014
Triadic Gaze Intervention for Young Children With Physical Disabilities
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lesley B. Olswang
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Patricia Dowden
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Julie Feuerstein
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Kathryn Greenslade
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Gay Lloyd Pinder
    Children’s Therapy Center of Kent, Kent, WA
  • Kandace Fleming
    University of Kansas, Lawrence
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Lesley B. Olswang: lolswang@uw.edu
  • Editor: Rhea Paul
    Editor: Rhea Paul×
  • Associate Editor: Stephanie Stokes
    Associate Editor: Stephanie Stokes×
Article Information
Development / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Early Identification & Intervention / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 2014
Triadic Gaze Intervention for Young Children With Physical Disabilities
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2014, Vol. 57, 1740-1753. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-L-13-0058
History: Received March 11, 2013 , Revised August 12, 2013 , Accepted March 10, 2014
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2014, Vol. 57, 1740-1753. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-L-13-0058
History: Received March 11, 2013; Revised August 12, 2013; Accepted March 10, 2014
Web of Science® Times Cited: 3

Purpose This randomized controlled study investigated whether a supplemental treatment designed to teach triadic gaze (TG) as a signal of coordinated joint attention would yield a significantly greater increase in TG in the experimental versus control group.

Method Eighteen 10- to 24-month-old children with severe motor impairments were randomly assigned to an experimental ( n = 9) or control group ( n = 9). For approximately 29 sessions over 17 weeks, experimental participants received TG treatment twice weekly with a speech-language pathologist in addition to standard practice. Control participants received only standard practice from birth-to-three therapists. Coders who were masked to group assignment coded TG productions with an unfamiliar speech-language pathologist at baseline, every 3 weeks during the experimental phase, and at the final measurement session.

Results TG increased across groups from baseline to final measurement, with the experimental group showing slightly greater change. Performance trends were examined using experimental phase moving averages. Comparisons revealed significant differences between groups at 2 time points (at 12 weeks, r = .30, a medium effect, and at the end of the phase, r = .50, a large effect).

Conclusion The results suggest the promise of a short-term, focused treatment to teach TG as a behavioral manifestation of coordinated joint attention to children with severe physical disabilities.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Grant P01HD018955 (“Treatment for Triadic Gaze”). We thank our colleagues at the University of Kansas for their continued input and support, Richard and Muriel Saunders, Nancy Brady, and Kathy Thiemann-Bourque. In addition, we thank Becca Hanson, Jodi Madden, Tina Watkinson, and Meredith Shatto for their dedication to this project as measurement and treatment clinicians, and our many graduate student coders. Finally, we thank the families and children who participated in the present study, without whom this work would not have been possible.
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