Validating Models of Clinical Word Recognition Tests for Spanish/English Bilinguals Purpose Shi and Sánchez (2010)  developed models to predict the optimal test language for evaluating Spanish/English (S/E) bilinguals' word recognition. The current study intended to validate their conclusions in a separate bilingual listener sample. Method Seventy normal-hearing S/E bilinguals varying in language profile were included. Participants were presented with ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 2014
Validating Models of Clinical Word Recognition Tests for Spanish/English Bilinguals
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lu-Feng Shi
    Long Island University, Brooklyn, NY
  • Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Lu-Feng Shi: lu.shi@liu.edu
  • Editor: Craig Champlin
    Editor: Craig Champlin×
  • Associate Editor: Deborah von Hapsburg
    Associate Editor: Deborah von Hapsburg×
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 2014
Validating Models of Clinical Word Recognition Tests for Spanish/English Bilinguals
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2014, Vol. 57, 1896-1907. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-H-13-0138
History: Received May 28, 2013 , Revised September 23, 2013 , Accepted February 18, 2014
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2014, Vol. 57, 1896-1907. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-H-13-0138
History: Received May 28, 2013; Revised September 23, 2013; Accepted February 18, 2014
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose Shi and Sánchez (2010)  developed models to predict the optimal test language for evaluating Spanish/English (S/E) bilinguals' word recognition. The current study intended to validate their conclusions in a separate bilingual listener sample.

Method Seventy normal-hearing S/E bilinguals varying in language profile were included. Participants were presented with English monosyllabic and Spanish bisyllabic words in quiet and in speech-spectrum noise (+6 and 0 dB SNR). Relative success on the 2 tests was indicated by the difference in z score for each test.

Results The current group of participants was comparable to participants in Shi and Sánchez (2010)  in regard to their language background and test performance. Previously developed models fit current data well. Age of English acquisition (AOAE) yielded more consistent models across test conditions than language dominance (LD). New models incorporating average proficiency rating (across domains) and relative proficiency rating (across languages) yielded best prediction.

Conclusions Shi and Sánchez's (2010)  models incorporating key linguistic variables (AOAE, LD, and average/relative proficiency ratings) can help clinicians predict bilingual clients' relative success in word recognition in Spanish versus English. These models are appropriate for current clinical work with S/E bilinguals in metropolitan areas similar to New York City.

Acknowledgments
The author would like to thank all volunteers who participated in this study, as well as Luz Adriana Canizales and Alejandra Olivencía for their involvement in this project.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access