Children With a History of SLI Show Reduced Sensitivity to Audiovisual Temporal Asynchrony: An ERP Study Purpose The authors examined whether school-age children with a history of specific language impairment (H-SLI), their peers with typical development (TD), and adults differ in sensitivity to audiovisual temporal asynchrony and whether such difference stems from the sensory encoding of audiovisual information. Method Fifteen H-SLI children, 15 TD children, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2014
Children With a History of SLI Show Reduced Sensitivity to Audiovisual Temporal Asynchrony: An ERP Study
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Natalya Kaganovich
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Jennifer Schumaker
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Laurence B. Leonard
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Dana Gustafson
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Danielle Macias
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Natalya Kaganovich: kaganovi@purdue.edu
  • Editor: Rhea Paul
    Editor: Rhea Paul×
  • Associate Editor: Andrew Whitehouse
    Associate Editor: Andrew Whitehouse×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2014
Children With a History of SLI Show Reduced Sensitivity to Audiovisual Temporal Asynchrony: An ERP Study
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2014, Vol. 57, 1480-1502. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-L-13-0192
History: Received July 19, 2013 , Revised November 28, 2013 , Accepted January 24, 2014
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2014, Vol. 57, 1480-1502. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-L-13-0192
History: Received July 19, 2013; Revised November 28, 2013; Accepted January 24, 2014
Web of Science® Times Cited: 7

Purpose The authors examined whether school-age children with a history of specific language impairment (H-SLI), their peers with typical development (TD), and adults differ in sensitivity to audiovisual temporal asynchrony and whether such difference stems from the sensory encoding of audiovisual information.

Method Fifteen H-SLI children, 15 TD children, and 15 adults judged whether a flashed explosion-shaped figure and a 2-kHz pure tone occurred simultaneously. The stimuli were presented at 0-, 100-, 200-, 300-, 400-, and 500-ms temporal offsets. This task was combined with EEG recordings.

Results H-SLI children were profoundly less sensitive to temporal separations between auditory and visual modalities compared with their TD peers. Those H-SLI children who performed better at simultaneity judgment also had higher language aptitude. TD children were less accurate than adults, revealing a remarkably prolonged developmental course of the audiovisual temporal discrimination. Analysis of early event-related potential components suggested that poor sensory encoding was not a key factor in H-SLI children's reduced sensitivity to audiovisual asynchrony.

Conclusions Audiovisual temporal discrimination is impaired in H-SLI children and is still immature during mid-childhood in TD children. The present findings highlight the need for further evaluation of the role of atypical audiovisual processing in the development of SLI.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part by grants P30DC010745 and R03DC013151 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communicative Disorders, National Institutes of Health. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official view of the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communicative Disorders or the National Institutes of Health. We are thankful to Dr. Patricia Deevy and Kevin Barlow for their assistance with different stages of this project and to children and their families for participation. We are also grateful to Caryn Herring for creating the picture of the dragon and to Mohneet Ahuja for assistance with statistical analyses.
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