Influence of the Perceived Taste Intensity of Chemesthetic Stimuli on Swallowing Parameters Given Age and Genetic Taste Differences in Healthy Adult Women PurposeThis study examined whether the perceived taste intensity of liquids with chemesthetic properties influenced lingua-palatal pressures and submental surface electromyography (sEMG) in swallowing, compared with water.MethodSwallowing was studied in 80 healthy women, stratified by age group and genetic taste status. General Labeled Magnitude Scale ratings of taste intensity were collected ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2014
Influence of the Perceived Taste Intensity of Chemesthetic Stimuli on Swallowing Parameters Given Age and Genetic Taste Differences in Healthy Adult Women
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Cathy A. Pelletier
    University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock
    Charlestown Retirement Community, Catonsville, MD
  • Catriona M. Steele
    Toronto Rehabilitation Institute—University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Disclosure:The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure:The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Catriona M. Steele: catriona.steele@uhn.ca
  • Editor: Jody Kreiman
    Editor: Jody Kreiman×
  • Associate Editor: Caryn Easterling
    Associate Editor: Caryn Easterling×
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Speech
Research Article   |   February 01, 2014
Influence of the Perceived Taste Intensity of Chemesthetic Stimuli on Swallowing Parameters Given Age and Genetic Taste Differences in Healthy Adult Women
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2014, Vol. 57, 46-56. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2013/13-0005)
History: Received January 4, 2013 , Revised April 7, 2013 , Accepted May 24, 2013
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2014, Vol. 57, 46-56. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2013/13-0005)
History: Received January 4, 2013; Revised April 7, 2013; Accepted May 24, 2013
Web of Science® Times Cited: 9

PurposeThis study examined whether the perceived taste intensity of liquids with chemesthetic properties influenced lingua-palatal pressures and submental surface electromyography (sEMG) in swallowing, compared with water.

MethodSwallowing was studied in 80 healthy women, stratified by age group and genetic taste status. General Labeled Magnitude Scale ratings of taste intensity were collected for deionized water; carbonated water; 2.7% w/v citric acid; and diluted ethanol. These stimuli were swallowed, with measurement of tongue-palate pressures and submental sEMG. Path analysis differentiated stimulus, genetic taste status, age, and perceived taste intensity effects on swallowing. Signal amplitude during effortful saliva swallowing served as a covariate representing participant strength.

ResultsSignificant differences (p < .05) in taste intensity were seen across liquids: citric acid > ethanol > carbonated water > water. Supertasters perceived greater taste intensity than did nontasters. Lingua-palatal pressure and sEMG amplitudes were correlated with the strength covariate. Anterior palate pressures and sEMG amplitudes were significantly higher for the citric acid stimulus. Perceived taste intensity was a significant mediator of stimulus differences.

ConclusionThese data provide confirmatory evidence that high-intensity sour stimuli do influence swallowing behaviors. In addition, taste genetics influence the perception of taste intensity for stimuli with chemesthetic properties, which modulates behavioral responses.

Acknowledgments
Funding for this study was provided through an American Speech-Language-Hearing Association New Investigator award to Cathy A. Pelletier. Additional funding was provided by the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences and Johns Hopkins Hospital. Catriona M. Steele acknowledges funding from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders and the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute—University Health Network, which receives funding from the Provincial Rehabilitation Research program of the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. The views expressed do not necessarily reflect those of the Ministry. We gratefully acknowledge assistance and advice from Karen Grace-Martin with the statistical analyses and from Linda Bartoshuk, Christy Ludlow, and Rebecca German regarding analysis and interpretation of the data.
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