The Effect of Deep Brain Stimulation on the Speech Motor System Purpose Chronic deep brain stimulation of the nucleus ventralis intermedius is an effective treatment for individuals with medication-resistant essential tremor. However, these individuals report that stimulation has a deleterious effect on their speech. The present study investigates one important factor leading to these effects: the coordination of oral and glottal ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2014
The Effect of Deep Brain Stimulation on the Speech Motor System
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Doris Mücke
    Institut für Linguistik—Phonetik, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany
  • Johannes Becker
    Institut für Linguistik—Phonetik, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany
    Department of Neurology, University Hospital Cologne, Cologne, Germany
  • Michael T. Barbe
    Department of Neurology, University Hospital Cologne, Cologne, Germany
    Cognitive Neurology Section, Institute of Neurosciences and Medicine (INM-3), Research Centre Juelich, Juelich, Germany
  • Ingo Meister
    Department of Neurology, University Hospital Cologne, Cologne, Germany
  • Lena Liebhart
    Department of Neurology, University Hospital Cologne, Cologne, Germany
  • Timo B. Roettger
    Institut für Linguistik—Phonetik, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany
  • Till Dembek
    Department of Neurology, University Hospital Cologne, Cologne, Germany
  • Lars Timmermann
    Department of Neurology, University Hospital Cologne, Cologne, Germany
  • Martine Grice
    Institut für Linguistik—Phonetik, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Doris Mücke: doris.muecke@uni-koeln.de
  • Editor: Jody Kreiman
    Editor: Jody Kreiman×
  • Associate Editor: Julie Liss
    Associate Editor: Julie Liss×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2014
The Effect of Deep Brain Stimulation on the Speech Motor System
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2014, Vol. 57, 1206-1218. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-S-13-0155
History: Received June 20, 2013 , Revised December 3, 2013 , Accepted December 28, 2013
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2014, Vol. 57, 1206-1218. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-S-13-0155
History: Received June 20, 2013; Revised December 3, 2013; Accepted December 28, 2013
Web of Science® Times Cited: 8

Purpose Chronic deep brain stimulation of the nucleus ventralis intermedius is an effective treatment for individuals with medication-resistant essential tremor. However, these individuals report that stimulation has a deleterious effect on their speech. The present study investigates one important factor leading to these effects: the coordination of oral and glottal articulation.

Method Sixteen native-speaking German adults with essential tremor, between 26 and 86 years old, with and without chronic deep brain stimulation of the nucleus ventralis intermedius and 12 healthy, age-matched subjects were recorded performing a fast syllable repetition task (/papapa/, /tatata/, /kakaka/). Syllable duration and voicing-to-syllable ratio as well as parameters related directly to consonant production, voicing during constriction, and frication during constriction were measured.

Results Voicing during constriction was greater in subjects with essential tremor than in controls, indicating a perseveration of voicing into the voiceless consonant. Stimulation led to fewer voiceless intervals (voicing-to-syllable ratio), indicating a reduced degree of glottal abduction during the entire syllable cycle. Stimulation also induced incomplete oral closures (frication during constriction), indicating imprecise oral articulation.

Conclusion The detrimental effect of stimulation on the speech motor system can be quantified using acoustic measures at the subsyllabic level.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported by a grant of the German Research Foundation (DFG), Clinical Research Group 219 (KFO 219), to Lars Timmermann. We thank the participants with essential tremor for their participation in this study. We also thank Mohammad Maarouf (Department of Neurology, University Hospital Cologne), who implemented the deep brain stimulation in the individuals diagnosed with essential tremor.
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