An In Vivo Study of Composite Microgels Based on Hyaluronic Acid and Gelatin for the Reconstruction of Surgically Injured Rat Vocal Folds PurposeThe objective of this study was to investigate local injection with a hierarchically microstructured hyaluronic acid–gelatin (HA-Ge) hydrogel for the treatment of acute vocal fold injury using a rat model.MethodVocal fold stripping was performed unilaterally in 108 Sprague-Dawley rats. A volume of 25 μl saline (placebo controls), HA-bulk, or HA-Ge ... Supplement
Supplement  |   April 01, 2014
An In Vivo Study of Composite Microgels Based on Hyaluronic Acid and Gelatin for the Reconstruction of Surgically Injured Rat Vocal Folds
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jiska M. S. Coppoolse
    University of Groningen, The Netherlands
  • T. G. Van Kooten
    University of Groningen, The Netherlands
  • Hossein K. Heris
    McGill University, Montreal, Canada
  • Luc Mongeau
    McGill University, Montreal, Canada
  • Nicole Y. K. Li
    University of Maryland–College Park
  • Susan L. Thibeault
    University of Wisconsin–Madison
  • Jacob Pitaro
    McGill University, Montreal, Canada
  • Olubunmi Akinpelu
    McGill University, Montreal, Canada
  • Sam J. Daniel
    McGill University, Montreal, Canada
  • Disclosure:The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure:The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Luc Mongeau: luc.mongeau@mcgill.ca
  • Editor: Jody Kreiman
    Editor: Jody Kreiman×
  • Associate Editor: Bernard Rousseau
    Associate Editor: Bernard Rousseau×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Supplement
Supplement   |   April 01, 2014
An In Vivo Study of Composite Microgels Based on Hyaluronic Acid and Gelatin for the Reconstruction of Surgically Injured Rat Vocal Folds
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2014, Vol. 57, S658-S673. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-S-12-0292
History: Received September 10, 2012 , Revised June 25, 2013 , Accepted October 7, 2013
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2014, Vol. 57, S658-S673. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-S-12-0292
History: Received September 10, 2012; Revised June 25, 2013; Accepted October 7, 2013
Web of Science® Times Cited: 9

PurposeThe objective of this study was to investigate local injection with a hierarchically microstructured hyaluronic acid–gelatin (HA-Ge) hydrogel for the treatment of acute vocal fold injury using a rat model.

MethodVocal fold stripping was performed unilaterally in 108 Sprague-Dawley rats. A volume of 25 μl saline (placebo controls), HA-bulk, or HA-Ge hydrogel was injected into the lamina propria (LP) 5 days after surgery. The vocal folds were harvested at 3, 14, and 28 days after injection and analyzed using hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry staining for macrophages, myofibroblasts, elastin, collagen type I, and collagen type III.

ResultsThe macrophage count was statistically significantly lower in the HA-Ge group than in the saline group (p < .05) at Day 28. Results suggested that the HA-Ge injection did not induce inflammatory or rejection response. Myofibroblast counts and elastin were statistically insignificant across treatment groups at all time points. Increased elastin deposition was qualitatively observed in both HA groups from Day 3 to Day 28, and not in the saline group. Significantly more elastin was observed in the HA-bulk group than in the uninjured group at Day 28. Significantly more collagen type I was observed in the HA-bulk and HA-Ge groups than in the saline group (p < .05) at Day 28. The collagen type I concentration in the HA-Ge and saline groups was found to be comparable to that in the uninjured controls at Day 28. The concentration of collagen type III in all treatment groups was similar to that in uninjured controls at Day 28.

ConclusionLocal HA-Ge and HA-bulk injections for acute injured vocal folds were biocompatible and did not induce adverse response.

Acknowledgments
This work has been supported by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) Grant DC 005788 (L. Mongeau, PI). We acknowledge the support of NIDCD Grant DC 004336 (Thibeault, PI) for the collagen III staining and analysis, performed at the University of Wisconsin. We thank the staffs of the Bone Centre and Imaging Centre of McGill University for the use of their facilities and of the University of Wisconsin–Madison for their technical support. We acknowledge Drew Roenneburg and Sarah Wang for staining of histological slides against collagen III and associated image analysis. We also acknowledge Mario Mujica-Mota for helping with the surgeries.
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