Cognitive–Perceptual Examination of Remediation Approaches to Hypokinetic Dysarthria Purpose To determine how increased vocal loudness and reduced speech rate affect listeners' cognitive–perceptual processing of hypokinetic dysarthric speech associated with Parkinson's disease. Method Fifty-one healthy listener participants completed a speech perception experiment. Listeners repeated phrases produced by 5 individuals with dysarthria across habitual, loud, and slow speaking modes. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2014
Cognitive–Perceptual Examination of Remediation Approaches to Hypokinetic Dysarthria
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Megan J. McAuliffe
    University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
  • Sarah E. Kerr
    University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
  • Elizabeth M. R. Gibson
    University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
  • Tim Anderson
    New Zealand Brain Research Institute, Christchurch, New Zealand
  • Patrick J. LaShell
    University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Megan J. McAuliffe: megan.mcauliffe@canterbury.ac.nz
  • Editor: Jody Kreiman
    Editor: Jody Kreiman×
  • Associate Editor: Kate Bunton
    Associate Editor: Kate Bunton×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Dysarthria / Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2014
Cognitive–Perceptual Examination of Remediation Approaches to Hypokinetic Dysarthria
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2014, Vol. 57, 1268-1283. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-S-12-0349
History: Received November 4, 2012 , Revised May 24, 2013 , Accepted January 7, 2014
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2014, Vol. 57, 1268-1283. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-S-12-0349
History: Received November 4, 2012; Revised May 24, 2013; Accepted January 7, 2014
Web of Science® Times Cited: 4

Purpose To determine how increased vocal loudness and reduced speech rate affect listeners' cognitive–perceptual processing of hypokinetic dysarthric speech associated with Parkinson's disease.

Method Fifty-one healthy listener participants completed a speech perception experiment. Listeners repeated phrases produced by 5 individuals with dysarthria across habitual, loud, and slow speaking modes. Listeners were allocated to habitual ( n = 17), loud ( n = 17), or slow ( n = 17) experimental conditions. Transcripts derived from the phrase repetition task were coded for overall accuracy (i.e., intelligibility), and perceptual error analyses examined how these conditions affected listeners' phonemic mapping (i.e., syllable resemblance) and lexical segmentation (i.e., lexical boundary error analysis).

Results Both speech conditions provided obvious perceptual benefits to listeners. Overall, transcript accuracy was highest in the slow condition. In the loud condition, however, improvement was evidenced across the experiment. An error analysis suggested that listeners in the loud condition prioritized acoustic–phonetic cues in their attempts to resolve the degraded signal, whereas those in the slow condition appeared to preferentially weight lexical stress cues.

Conclusions Increased loudness and reduced rate exhibited differential effects on listeners' perceptual processing of dysarthric speech. The current study highlights the insights that may be gained from a cognitive–perceptual approach.

Acknowledgments
We sincerely thank the participants with Parkinson's disease, their families, and the individual listeners who participated in this research. Support from the New Zealand Neurological Foundation (Project Grant 0827-PG) is gratefully acknowledged. We also thank Julie Liss for advice and suggestions on various aspects of this research, Rene Utianski for comments on an earlier version of the article, and Maryam Ghaleh for research assistance.
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