Modeling the Biomechanical Influence of Epilaryngeal Stricture on the Vocal Folds: A Low-Dimensional Model of Vocal–Ventricular Fold Coupling PurposePhysiological and phonetic studies suggest that, at moderate levels of epilaryngeal stricture, the ventricular folds impinge upon the vocal folds and influence their dynamical behavior, which is thought to be responsible for constricted laryngeal sounds. In this work, the authors examine this hypothesis through biomechanical modeling.MethodThe dynamical response of a ... Supplement
Supplement  |   April 01, 2014
Modeling the Biomechanical Influence of Epilaryngeal Stricture on the Vocal Folds: A Low-Dimensional Model of Vocal–Ventricular Fold Coupling
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Scott R. Moisik
    Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, the Netherlands
  • John H. Esling
    University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
  • Disclosure:The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure:The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Scott R. Moisik:srmoisik@uvic.ca
  • Editor: Jody Kreiman
    Editor: Jody Kreiman×
  • Associate Editor: Scott Thomson
    Associate Editor: Scott Thomson×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Supplement
Supplement   |   April 01, 2014
Modeling the Biomechanical Influence of Epilaryngeal Stricture on the Vocal Folds: A Low-Dimensional Model of Vocal–Ventricular Fold Coupling
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2014, Vol. 57, S687-S704. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-S-12-0279
History: Received September 2, 2012 , Revised February 18, 2013 , Accepted January 15, 2014
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2014, Vol. 57, S687-S704. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-S-12-0279
History: Received September 2, 2012; Revised February 18, 2013; Accepted January 15, 2014
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

PurposePhysiological and phonetic studies suggest that, at moderate levels of epilaryngeal stricture, the ventricular folds impinge upon the vocal folds and influence their dynamical behavior, which is thought to be responsible for constricted laryngeal sounds. In this work, the authors examine this hypothesis through biomechanical modeling.

MethodThe dynamical response of a low-dimensional, lumped-element model of the vocal folds under the influence of vocal–ventricular fold coupling was evaluated. The model was assessed for F0 and cover-mass phase difference. Case studies of simulations of different constricted phonation types and of glottal stop illustrate various additional aspects of model performance.

ResultsSimulated vocal–ventricular fold coupling lowers F0 and perturbs the mucosal wave. It also appears to reinforce irregular patterns of oscillation, and it can enhance laryngeal closure in glottal stop production.

ConclusionThe effects of simulated vocal–ventricular fold coupling are consistent with sounds, such as creaky voice, harsh voice, and glottal stop, that have been observed to involve epilaryngeal stricture and apparent contact between the vocal folds and ventricular folds. This supports the view that vocal–ventricular fold coupling is important in the vibratory dynamics of such sounds and, furthermore, suggests that these sounds may intrinsically require epilaryngeal stricture.

Acknowledgments
This research was funded by Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada Research Grants 410-2007-2375 and 410-2011-0229. This work is based on research presented at the 8th International Conference on Voice Physiology and Biomechanics (ICVPB) 2012, Erlangen, Germany. We wish to thank Peter Birkholz for his support in helping us implement his aero-acoustic simulation and for his comments on an early version of this article.
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