Preliminary Results on the Influence of Engineered Artificial Mucus Layer on Phonation PurposePrevious studies have confirmed the influence of dehydration and an altered mucus (e.g., due to pathologies) on phonation. However, the underlying reasons for these influences are not fully understood. This study was a preliminary inquiry into the influences of mucus architecture and concentration on vocal fold oscillation.MethodTwo excised human larynges ... Supplement
Supplement  |   April 01, 2014
Preliminary Results on the Influence of Engineered Artificial Mucus Layer on Phonation
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michael Döllinger
    University Hospital Erlangen, Germany
  • Franziska Gröhn
    University Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany
  • David A. Berry
    Laryngeal Dynamics Laboratory, UCLA Head & Neck Surgery, Los Angeles, CA
  • Ulrich Eysholdt
    University Hospital Erlangen, Germany
  • Georg Luegmair
    University Hospital Erlangen, Germany
  • Disclosure Statement: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure Statement: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Michael Döllinger: michael.doellinger@uk-erlangen.de
  • Editor: Craig Champlin
    Editor: Craig Champlin×
  • Associate Editor: Heather Bonilha
    Associate Editor: Heather Bonilha×
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Supplement
Supplement   |   April 01, 2014
Preliminary Results on the Influence of Engineered Artificial Mucus Layer on Phonation
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2014, Vol. 57, S637-S647. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-S-12-0277
History: Received August 31, 2012 , Revised January 11, 2013 , Accepted May 23, 2013
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2014, Vol. 57, S637-S647. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-S-12-0277
History: Received August 31, 2012; Revised January 11, 2013; Accepted May 23, 2013
Web of Science® Times Cited: 5

PurposePrevious studies have confirmed the influence of dehydration and an altered mucus (e.g., due to pathologies) on phonation. However, the underlying reasons for these influences are not fully understood. This study was a preliminary inquiry into the influences of mucus architecture and concentration on vocal fold oscillation.

MethodTwo excised human larynges were investigated in an in vitro setup. The oscillations of the vocal folds at various airflow volume rates were recorded through the use of high-speed imaging. Engineered mucus containing polymers (interconnected polymers and linear polymers) was applied to the vocal folds. From the high-speed footage, glottal parameters were extracted through the use of objective methods and were compared to a gold standard (physiological saline solution).

ResultsVariations were found for all applications of mucus. Fundamental frequency dropped and the oscillatory behavior (speed quotient [SQ], closing quotient [CQ]) changed for both larynges. The 2 applied mucus architectures displayed different effects on the larynges. The interconnected polymer displayed clear low-pass filter characteristics not found for the linear polymer. Increase of polymer concentration affected parameters to a certain point.

ConclusionThe data confirm results found in previous studies. Furthermore, the different effects—comparing architecture and concentration—suggest that, in the future, synthetic mucus can be designed to improve phonation.

Acknowledgments
The work was supported by Deutsche Krebshilfe Grant 109204 (“Analyse und Modellierung der pharyngo-ösophagealen Schleimhautdynamik nach krankheitsbedingter Kehlkopfentfernung”) and by Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, German Research Foundation Grant FOR894/1 (“Strömungsphysikalische Grundlagen der Menschlichen Stimmgebung”).
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