Articulatory Closure Proficiency in Patients With Parkinson's Disease Following Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus and Caudal Zona Incerta Purpose The present study aimed at comparing the effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) treatment of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the caudal zona incerta (cZi) on the proficiency in achieving oral closure and release during plosive production of people with Parkinson's disease. Method Nineteen patients participated preoperatively and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2014
Articulatory Closure Proficiency in Patients With Parkinson's Disease Following Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus and Caudal Zona Incerta
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Fredrik Karlsson
    Umeå University, Sweden
  • Katarina Olofsson
    Umeå University, Sweden
  • Patric Blomstedt
    Umeå University, Sweden
  • Jan Linder
    Umeå University, Sweden
  • Erik Nordh
    Umeå University, Sweden
  • Jan van Doorn
    Umeå University, Sweden
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Fredrik Karlsson: fredrik.karlsson@logopedi.umu.se
  • Editor: Jody Kreiman
    Editor: Jody Kreiman×
  • Associate Editor: Julie Liss
    Associate Editor: Julie Liss×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Dysarthria / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2014
Articulatory Closure Proficiency in Patients With Parkinson's Disease Following Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus and Caudal Zona Incerta
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2014, Vol. 57, 1178-1190. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-S-13-0010
History: Received January 10, 2013 , Revised August 20, 2013 , Accepted November 20, 2013
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2014, Vol. 57, 1178-1190. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-S-13-0010
History: Received January 10, 2013; Revised August 20, 2013; Accepted November 20, 2013
Web of Science® Times Cited: 2

Purpose The present study aimed at comparing the effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) treatment of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the caudal zona incerta (cZi) on the proficiency in achieving oral closure and release during plosive production of people with Parkinson's disease.

Method Nineteen patients participated preoperatively and 12 months after DBS surgery. Nine patients had implantations in the STN, 7 bilaterally and 2 unilaterally (left). Ten had bilateral implantations in the cZi. Postoperative examinations were made off and on stimulation. All patients received simultaneous L-dopa treatment in all conditions. For a series of plosives extracted from a reading passage, absolute and relative measures of duration of frication and amplitude of plosive release were compared between conditions within each treatment group.

Results Relative duration of frication increased in voiceless plosives in the on-stimulation condition in cZi patients. Similar trends were observed across the data set. Duration of prerelease frication and the release peak prominence increased in voiceless plosives on stimulation for both groups.

Conclusion The increased release prominence suggests that patients achieved a stronger closure gesture because of DBS but that the increased energy available resulted in increased frication.

Acknowledgments
We would like to thank deep brain stimulation nurse specialist Anna Fredricks for assistance in providing patient information and research engineer Anders Asplund for preparation of the speech recordings. We wish to acknowledge the support of grants from the Swedish Research Council (Grant No. 2009-946) and Magnus Bergvall's Foundation in Sweden. A visiting professorship at the Rehabilitation Research Chair, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, to Erik Nordh is gratefully acknowledged.
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