A Longitudinal Study in Adults With Sequential Bilateral Cochlear Implants: Time Course for Individual Ear and Bilateral Performance Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the rate of progress in the 2nd implanted ear as it relates to the 1st implanted ear and to bilateral performance in adult sequential cochlear implant recipients. In addition, this study aimed to identify factors that contribute to patient outcomes. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2014
A Longitudinal Study in Adults With Sequential Bilateral Cochlear Implants: Time Course for Individual Ear and Bilateral Performance
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ruth M. Reeder
    Washington University in St. Louis, MO
  • Jill B. Firszt
    Washington University in St. Louis, MO
  • Laura K. Holden
    Washington University in St. Louis, MO
  • Michael J. Strube
    Washington University in St. Louis, MO
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Ruth M. Reeder: reederr@wustl.edu
  • Editor: Craig Champlin
    Editor: Craig Champlin×
  • Associate Editor: Paul Abbas
    Associate Editor: Paul Abbas×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2014
A Longitudinal Study in Adults With Sequential Bilateral Cochlear Implants: Time Course for Individual Ear and Bilateral Performance
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2014, Vol. 57, 1108-1126. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-H-13-0087
History: Received April 5, 2013 , Revised October 30, 2013 , Accepted November 9, 2013
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2014, Vol. 57, 1108-1126. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-H-13-0087
History: Received April 5, 2013; Revised October 30, 2013; Accepted November 9, 2013
Web of Science® Times Cited: 5

Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the rate of progress in the 2nd implanted ear as it relates to the 1st implanted ear and to bilateral performance in adult sequential cochlear implant recipients. In addition, this study aimed to identify factors that contribute to patient outcomes.

Method The authors performed a prospective longitudinal study in 21 adults who received bilateral sequential cochlear implants. Testing occurred at 6 intervals: prebilateral through 12 months postbilateral implantation. Measures evaluated speech recognition in quiet and noise, localization, and perceived benefit.

Results Second ear performance was similar to 1st ear performance by 6 months postbilateral implantation. Bilateral performance was generally superior to either ear alone; however, participants with shorter 2nd ear length of deafness (<20 years) had more rapid early improvement and better overall outcomes than those with longer 2nd ear length of deafness (>30 years). All participants reported bilateral benefit.

Conclusions Adult cochlear implant recipients demonstrated benefit from 2nd ear implantation for speech recognition, localization, and perceived communication function. Because performance outcomes were related to length of deafness, shorter time between surgeries may be warranted to reduce negative length-of-deafness effects. Future study may clarify the impact of other variables, such as preimplant hearing aid use, particularly for individuals with longer periods of deafness.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant R01DC009010. We acknowledge and thank the following individuals: Nöel Dwyer, Brenda Gotter, Karen Mispagel, Lisa Potts, and Sallie Vanderhoof for assistance with data collection; Chris Brenner, Megan Carter, Sheli Lipson, and Brandi Odle for data entry; Tim Holden for test equipment and stimuli calibration; and our patients for their time and participation in this study.
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