Improving Child Compliance on a Computer-Administered Nonword Repetition Task Purpose A range of nonword repetition (NWR) tasks are used in research and clinical applications, but compliance rates among young children remain low. Live presentation is usually used to improve compliance rates, but this lacks the consistency of recorded stimuli. In this study, the authors examined whether a novel delivery ... Research Note
Research Note  |   June 01, 2014
Improving Child Compliance on a Computer-Administered Nonword Repetition Task
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kamila Polišenská
    University of Manchester, United Kingdom
  • Svetlana Kapalková
    Comenius University, Bratislava, Slovakia
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Kamila Polišenská: kamila.polisenska@manchester.ac.uk
  • Editor: Rhea Paul
    Editor: Rhea Paul×
  • Associate Editor: Stephanie Stokes
    Associate Editor: Stephanie Stokes×
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Language Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Note
Research Note   |   June 01, 2014
Improving Child Compliance on a Computer-Administered Nonword Repetition Task
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2014, Vol. 57, 1060-1068. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2013/13-0014)
History: Received January 16, 2013 , Revised May 17, 2013 , Accepted August 19, 2013
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2014, Vol. 57, 1060-1068. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2013/13-0014)
History: Received January 16, 2013; Revised May 17, 2013; Accepted August 19, 2013
Web of Science® Times Cited: 2

Purpose A range of nonword repetition (NWR) tasks are used in research and clinical applications, but compliance rates among young children remain low. Live presentation is usually used to improve compliance rates, but this lacks the consistency of recorded stimuli. In this study, the authors examined whether a novel delivery of NWR stimuli based on recorded material could provide improved compliance rates in young children, thereby reducing research bias.

Method The novel NWR task with 26 recorded items was administered to 391 typically developing children ages 2–6 years. The children were presented with a story that they could influence by repeating “magic” words. The task was administered via computer with animation.

Results From the 384 children who completed the task, the authors found a noncompliance rate related to age. In line with previous research, no effect of demographic factors was found, but there was a significant main effect of age, syllable length, and phonological complexity on repetition accuracy. Test–retest and interrater scoring showed high levels of reliability.

Conclusion The task described in this study offers an objective delivery of recorded stimuli that engages young children and provides high compliance rates. The task is inexpensive, requires minimal training, and can be adapted to other languages.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by contract no. APVV-0410-11 from the Slovak Research and Development Agency. The writing of this article was supported by COST Action IS0804, “Language Impairment in a Multilingual Society: Linguistic Patterns and the Road to Assessment” (http://www.bi-sli.org). We would also like to thank Zuzana Vicenová, Lenka Distlerová, Michaela Halamová, Martina Sussová, and Simona Mihaliková for their assistance with data collection, J. D. Fenton (www.edthis.com) for editing, and to all of the nursery staff members, parents, and children who participated.
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