Speech Compensation for Time-Scale-Modified Auditory Feedback PurposeThe purpose of this study was to examine speech compensation in response to time-scale-modified auditory feedback during the transition of the semivowel for a target utterance of /ija/.MethodEach utterance session consisted of 10 control trials in the normal feedback condition followed by 20 perturbed trials in the modified auditory feedback ... Supplement
Supplement  |   April 01, 2014
Speech Compensation for Time-Scale-Modified Auditory Feedback
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rintaro Ogane
    Waseda University, Saitama, Japan
  • Masaaki Honda
    Waseda University, Saitama, Japan
  • Disclosure:The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure:The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Masaaki Honda: hon@waseda.jp
  • Editor: Jody Kreiman
    Editor: Jody Kreiman×
  • Associate Editor: Ewa Jacewicz
    Associate Editor: Ewa Jacewicz×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Supplement
Supplement   |   April 01, 2014
Speech Compensation for Time-Scale-Modified Auditory Feedback
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2014, Vol. 57, S616-S625. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-S-12-0214
History: Received July 5, 2012 , Revised February 8, 2013 , Accepted September 26, 2013
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2014, Vol. 57, S616-S625. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-S-12-0214
History: Received July 5, 2012; Revised February 8, 2013; Accepted September 26, 2013
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

PurposeThe purpose of this study was to examine speech compensation in response to time-scale-modified auditory feedback during the transition of the semivowel for a target utterance of /ija/.

MethodEach utterance session consisted of 10 control trials in the normal feedback condition followed by 20 perturbed trials in the modified auditory feedback condition and 10 return trials in the normal feedback condition. The authors examined speech compensation and the aftereffect in terms of 3 acoustic features: the maximum velocities on the (a) F1 and (b) F2 trajectories (VF1 and VF2) and (c) the F1–F2 onset time difference (TD) during the transition. They also conducted a syllable perception test on the feedback speech.

ResultsSpeech compensation was observed in VF1, VF2, and TD. The magnitudes of speech compensation in VF1 and TD monotonically increased as the amount of the time-scale perturbation increased. The amount of speech compensation increased as the phonemic perception change increased.

ConclusionsSpeech compensation for time-scale-modified auditory feedback is carried out primarily by changing VF1 and secondarily by adjusting VF2 and TD. Furthermore, it is activated primarily by detecting the speed change in altered feedback speech and secondarily by detecting the phonemic categorical change.

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