Tissue-Point Motion Tracking in the Tongue From Cine MRI and Tagged MRI PurposeAccurate tissue motion tracking within the tongue can help professionals diagnose and treat vocal tract–related disorders, evaluate speech quality before and after surgery, and conduct various scientific studies. The authors compared tissue tracking results from 4 widely used deformable registration (DR) methods applied to cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with ... Supplement
Supplement  |   April 01, 2014
Tissue-Point Motion Tracking in the Tongue From Cine MRI and Tagged MRI
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jonghye Woo
    University of Maryland School of Dentistry, Baltimore, MD
  • Maureen Stone
    University of Maryland School of Dentistry, Baltimore, MD
  • Yuanming Suo
    Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD
  • Emi Z. Murano
    Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD
  • Jerry L. Prince
    Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD
  • Disclosure:The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure:The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Maureen Stone: mstone@umaryland.edu
  • Editor: Jody Kreiman
    Editor: Jody Kreiman×
  • Associate Editor: Kate Bunton
    Associate Editor: Kate Bunton×
Article Information
Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Supplement
Supplement   |   April 01, 2014
Tissue-Point Motion Tracking in the Tongue From Cine MRI and Tagged MRI
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2014, Vol. 57, S626-S636. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-S-12-0208
History: Received June 29, 2012 , Revised February 4, 2013 , Accepted September 26, 2013
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2014, Vol. 57, S626-S636. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-S-12-0208
History: Received June 29, 2012; Revised February 4, 2013; Accepted September 26, 2013

PurposeAccurate tissue motion tracking within the tongue can help professionals diagnose and treat vocal tract–related disorders, evaluate speech quality before and after surgery, and conduct various scientific studies. The authors compared tissue tracking results from 4 widely used deformable registration (DR) methods applied to cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with harmonic phase (HARP)–based tracking applied to tagged MRI.

MethodTen subjects repeated the phrase “a geese” multiple times while sagittal images of the head were collected at 26 Hz, first in a tagged MRI data set and then in a cine MRI data set. HARP tracked the motion of 8 specified tissue points in the tagged data set. Four DR methods including diffeomorphic demons and free-form deformations based on cubic B-spline with 3 different similarity measures were used to track the same 8 points in the cine MRI data set. Individual points were tracked and length changes of several muscles were calculated using the DR- and HARP-based tracking methods.

ResultsThe results showed that the DR tracking errors were nonsystematic and varied in direction, amount, and timing across speakers and within speakers. Comparison of HARP and DR tracking with manual tracking showed better tracking results for HARP except at the tongue surface, where mistracking caused greater errors in HARP than DR.

ConclusionsTissue point tracking using DR tracking methods contains nonsystematic tracking errors within and across subjects, making it less successful than tagged MRI tracking within the tongue. However, HARP sometimes mistracks points at the tongue surface of tagged MRI because of its limited bandpass filter and tag pattern fading, so that DR has better success measuring surface tissue points on cine MRI than HARP does. Therefore, a hybrid method is being explored.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part by Grants R01 CA133015 (PI: M. Stone) and K99 DC012575 (PI: J. Woo) from the National Institutes of Health. Parts of this article were presented at the 2011 International Seminar on Speech Production, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
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