Safety Behaviors and Speech Treatment for Adults Who Stutter Purpose Those with anxiety use safety behaviors when attempting to prevent negative outcomes. There is evidence that these behaviors contribute to the persistence of anxiety disorders. Safety behaviors have been prominent in the cognitive behavior therapy literature during the last decade, particularly with social phobia management. However, nothing is known ... Research Note
Research Note  |   August 01, 2014
Safety Behaviors and Speech Treatment for Adults Who Stutter
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Fjola Dogg Helgadottir
    University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Ross G. Menzies
    University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Mark Onslow
    University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Ann Packman
    University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Sue O'Brian
    University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Mark Onslow: mark.onslow@sydney.edu.au
  • Fjola Dogg Helgadottir is now at the University of Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Fjola Dogg Helgadottir is now at the University of Oxford, United Kingdom.×
  • Editor: Jody Kreiman
    Editor: Jody Kreiman×
  • Associate Editor: Hans-Georg Bosshardt
    Associate Editor: Hans-Georg Bosshardt×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech / Research Note
Research Note   |   August 01, 2014
Safety Behaviors and Speech Treatment for Adults Who Stutter
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2014, Vol. 57, 1308-1313. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-S-13-0041
History: Received February 20, 2013 , Revised July 29, 2013 , Accepted November 7, 2013
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2014, Vol. 57, 1308-1313. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-S-13-0041
History: Received February 20, 2013; Revised July 29, 2013; Accepted November 7, 2013
Web of Science® Times Cited: 2

Purpose Those with anxiety use safety behaviors when attempting to prevent negative outcomes. There is evidence that these behaviors contribute to the persistence of anxiety disorders. Safety behaviors have been prominent in the cognitive behavior therapy literature during the last decade, particularly with social phobia management. However, nothing is known of safety behavior use by those who stutter. This is surprising given the high prevalence of social phobia in the stuttering population who seek clinical help.

Method Clinical psychologists and speech-language pathologists (SLPs) created a list of safety behaviors that might be used by adults during treatment for stuttering. Participants were 160 SLPs who were asked whether they advised adults who stutter to use any of these safety behaviors.

Results SLPs commonly recommend safety behaviors during stuttering management. Factor structures were found for the following 5 safety behavior categories: (a) general safety behaviors, (b) practice and rehearsal, (c) general avoidance, (d) choosing safe and easy people, and (e) control-related safety behaviors.

Conclusions There is a need to determine the frequency with which adults who receive stuttering treatment follow these clinician recommendations. In addition, there is a need to experimentally determine whether following such recommendations prevents fear extinction at long-term follow-up.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by Program Grant 633007 from the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia.
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