Webcam Delivery of the Lidcombe Program for Early Stuttering: A Phase I Clinical Trial Purpose The Lidcombe Program is an operant treatment for early stuttering shown with meta-analysis to have a favorable odds ratio. However, many clients are unable to access the treatment because of distance and lifestyle factors. In this Phase I trial, we explored the potential efficacy, practicality, and viability of an ... Research Note
Research Note  |   June 01, 2014
Webcam Delivery of the Lidcombe Program for Early Stuttering: A Phase I Clinical Trial
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sue O’Brian
    Australian Stuttering Research Centre, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Kylie Smith
    Australian Stuttering Research Centre, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Mark Onslow
    Australian Stuttering Research Centre, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Mark Onslow: mark.onslow@sydney.edu.au
  • Editor: Jody Kreiman
    Editor: Jody Kreiman×
  • Associate Editor: Hans-Georg Bosshardt
    Associate Editor: Hans-Georg Bosshardt×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech
Research Note   |   June 01, 2014
Webcam Delivery of the Lidcombe Program for Early Stuttering: A Phase I Clinical Trial
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2014, Vol. 57, 825-830. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-S-13-0094
History: Received April 11, 2013 , Revised August 18, 2013 , Accepted October 21, 2013
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2014, Vol. 57, 825-830. doi:10.1044/2014_JSLHR-S-13-0094
History: Received April 11, 2013; Revised August 18, 2013; Accepted October 21, 2013
Web of Science® Times Cited: 5

Purpose The Lidcombe Program is an operant treatment for early stuttering shown with meta-analysis to have a favorable odds ratio. However, many clients are unable to access the treatment because of distance and lifestyle factors. In this Phase I trial, we explored the potential efficacy, practicality, and viability of an Internet webcam Lidcombe Program service delivery model.

Method Participants were 3 preschool children who stuttered and their parents, all of whom received assessment and treatment using webcam in their homes with no clinic attendance.

Results At 6 months post–Stage 1 completion, all children were stuttering below 1.0% syllables stuttered. The webcam intervention was acceptable to the parents and appeared to be practical and viable, with only occasional audiovisual problems. At present, there is no reason to doubt that a webcam-delivered Lidcombe Program will be shown with clinical trials to have comparable efficacy with the clinic version.

Conclusion Webcam-delivered Lidcombe Program intervention is potentially efficacious, is practical and viable, and requires further exploration with comparative clinical trials and a qualitative study of parent and caregiver experiences.

Acknowledgment
This research was supported in part by National Health and Medical Research Council Program Grant 633007.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access