The Efficiency of Attentional Networks in Children Who Stutter PurposeThe purpose of this study was to evaluate whether previously reported questionnaire-based differences in self-regulatory behaviors (Eggers, De Nil, & Van den Bergh, 2009, 2010) between children who stutter (CWS) and children who do not stutter (CWNS) would also be reflected in their underlying attentional networks.MethodParticipants consisted of 41 CWS ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2012
The Efficiency of Attentional Networks in Children Who Stutter
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kurt Eggers
    Lessius University College, Antwerp, Belgium
  • Luc F. De Nil
    Lessius University College, Antwerp, Belgium
  • Bea R. H. Van den Bergh
    Lessius University College, Antwerp, Belgium
  • Correspondence to Kurt Eggers: kurt.eggers@lessius.eu
  • Editor: Anne Smith
    Editor: Anne Smith×
  • Associate Editor: Julie Anderson
    Associate Editor: Julie Anderson×
Article Information
Speech
Article   |   June 01, 2012
The Efficiency of Attentional Networks in Children Who Stutter
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2012, Vol. 55, 946-959. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/10-0208)
History: Received July 29, 2010 , Revised February 3, 2011 , Accepted October 21, 2011
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2012, Vol. 55, 946-959. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/10-0208)
History: Received July 29, 2010; Revised February 3, 2011; Accepted October 21, 2011
Web of Science® Times Cited: 14

PurposeThe purpose of this study was to evaluate whether previously reported questionnaire-based differences in self-regulatory behaviors (Eggers, De Nil, & Van den Bergh, 2009, 2010) between children who stutter (CWS) and children who do not stutter (CWNS) would also be reflected in their underlying attentional networks.

MethodParticipants consisted of 41 CWS (mean age = 6;09; years;months) and 41 CWNS (mean age = 6;09) ranging in age from 4;00 to 9;00. Participants were matched on age and gender. The efficiency of the attentional networks was assessed by using the computerized Attention Network Test (Fan, McCandliss, Sommer, Raz, & Posner, 2002).

ResultsPrimary results indicated that CWS had a significantly lower efficiency of the orienting network compared with CWNS, whereas no differences were found on the alerting or executive control network.

ConclusionCurrent findings corroborate previously found differences in self-regulatory behavior and were taken to suggest a possible role for attentional processes in developmental stuttering.

Acknowledgments
The present study was supported by Lessius University College. We thank the children and parents who participated in this study and student Hanne Vermeire for her assistance in processing some of the data.
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