Intensive Voice Treatment (LSVT LOUD) for Children With Spastic Cerebral Palsy and Dysarthria PurposeThe purpose of this study was to examine the effects of an intensive voice treatment (Lee Silverman Voice Treatment, commonly known as LSVT LOUD) for children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) and dysarthria.MethodA nonconcurrent multiple baseline single-subject design with replication across 5 children with spastic CP was used. Auditory–perceptual analysis ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2012
Intensive Voice Treatment (LSVT LOUD) for Children With Spastic Cerebral Palsy and Dysarthria
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Cynthia Marie Fox
    National Center for Voice and Speech, Denver, CO
  • Carol Ann Boliek
    University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
  • Disclosure Statement
    Disclosure Statement×
    Cynthia Marie Fox receives lecture honoraria and has ownership interest in the for-profit company LSVT Global, Inc. She is in full compliance with Federal Statute 42 C.F.R., Part 50, Subpart F (see http://grants.nih.gov/grants/compliance/42_CFR_50_Subpart_F.htm) and the University of Colorado–Boulder Policy on Conflict of Interest and Commitment.
    Cynthia Marie Fox receives lecture honoraria and has ownership interest in the for-profit company LSVT Global, Inc. She is in full compliance with Federal Statute 42 C.F.R., Part 50, Subpart F (see http://grants.nih.gov/grants/compliance/42_CFR_50_Subpart_F.htm) and the University of Colorado–Boulder Policy on Conflict of Interest and Commitment.×
  • Correspondence to Cynthia Marie Fox: cynthia.fox@lsvtglobal.com
  • Editor: Anne Smith
    Editor: Anne Smith×
  • Associate Editor: Jessica Huber
    Associate Editor: Jessica Huber×
Article Information
Speech
Article   |   June 01, 2012
Intensive Voice Treatment (LSVT LOUD) for Children With Spastic Cerebral Palsy and Dysarthria
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2012, Vol. 55, 930-945. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/10-0235)
History: Received August 24, 2010 , Revised March 4, 2011 , Accepted October 19, 2011
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2012, Vol. 55, 930-945. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/10-0235)
History: Received August 24, 2010; Revised March 4, 2011; Accepted October 19, 2011
Web of Science® Times Cited: 13

PurposeThe purpose of this study was to examine the effects of an intensive voice treatment (Lee Silverman Voice Treatment, commonly known as LSVT LOUD) for children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) and dysarthria.

MethodA nonconcurrent multiple baseline single-subject design with replication across 5 children with spastic CP was used. Auditory–perceptual analysis of speech, acoustic measures of vocal functioning, and perceptual ratings by parents of participants were obtained at baseline, posttreatment, and 6-week follow-up recording sessions.

ResultsListeners consistently preferred the speech samples taken immediately posttreatment over those taken during the baseline phase for most perceptual characteristics rated in this study. Changes in acoustic measures of vocal functioning were not consistent across participants and occurred more frequently for maximum performance tasks as opposed to speech. Although parents of the treated participants reported an improved perception of vocal loudness immediately following treatment, maintenance of changes at 6-week follow-up varied across the participants. No changes were observed in the 5th participant, who did not receive treatment.

ConclusionsThese findings provide some preliminary observations that the children with spastic CP in this study not only tolerated intensive voice treatment but also showed improvement on select aspects of vocal functioning. These outcomes warrant further research through Phase 2 treatment studies.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported, in part, by National Multipurpose Research and Training Center Grant DC-01409 from the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communication Disorders and by the Final Project Fund from the Graduate College at the University of Arizona. This article is based on a doctoral dissertation completed by Cynthia Marie Fox at the University of Arizona under the direction of Carol Ann Boliek and Jeannette Hoit. We thank Jeannette Hoit, Brad Story, Leslie Tolbert, Becky Farley, and Lorraine Ramig for their expert advice. Special thanks go to the children and families who participated in this study.
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