An EMG Study of the Lip Muscles During Covert Auditory Verbal Hallucinations in Schizophrenia PurposeAuditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs) are speech perceptions in the absence of external stimulation. According to an influential theoretical account of AVHs in schizophrenia, a deficit in inner-speech monitoring may cause the patients' verbal thoughts to be perceived as external voices. The account is based on a predictive control model, in ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2013
An EMG Study of the Lip Muscles During Covert Auditory Verbal Hallucinations in Schizophrenia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lucile Rapin
    Université du Québec à Montréal, Québec, Canada
  • Marion Dohen
    Université de Grenoble, France
  • Mircea Polosan
    Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) de Grenoble, France
  • Pascal Perrier
    Université de Grenoble, France
  • Hélène Lœvenbruck
    Université de Grenoble, France
  • Disclosure:The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure:The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Hélène Lœvenbruck: Helene.Loevenbruck@upmf-grenoble.fr
  • Editor: Jody Kreiman
    Editor: Jody Kreiman×
  • Associate Editor: Jeffrey Berry
    Associate Editor: Jeffrey Berry×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Supplement
Research Article   |   December 01, 2013
An EMG Study of the Lip Muscles During Covert Auditory Verbal Hallucinations in Schizophrenia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2013, Vol. 56, S1882-S1893. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2013/12-0210)
History: Received June 30, 2012 , Revised February 8, 2013 , Accepted April 26, 2013
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2013, Vol. 56, S1882-S1893. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2013/12-0210)
History: Received June 30, 2012; Revised February 8, 2013; Accepted April 26, 2013

PurposeAuditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs) are speech perceptions in the absence of external stimulation. According to an influential theoretical account of AVHs in schizophrenia, a deficit in inner-speech monitoring may cause the patients' verbal thoughts to be perceived as external voices. The account is based on a predictive control model, in which individuals implement verbal self-monitoring. The authors examined lip muscle activity during AVHs in patients with schizophrenia to check whether inner speech occurred.

MethodLip muscle activity was recorded during covert AVHs (without articulation) and rest. Surface electromyography (EMG) was used on 11 patients with schizophrenia.

ResultsResults showed an increase in EMG activity in the orbicularis oris inferior muscle during covert AVHs relative to rest. This increase was not due to general muscular tension because there was no increase of muscular activity in the forearm muscle.

ConclusionThis evidence that AVHs might be self-generated inner speech is discussed in the framework of a predictive control model. Further work is needed to better describe how inner speech is controlled and monitored and the nature of inner-speech-monitoring-dysfunction. This will lead to a better understanding of how AVHs occur.

Acknowledgments
This project was partially funded by a grant from the Région Rhône-Alpes Cluster 11 “Handicap Vieillissement Neurosciences” to H. Lœvenbruck and M. Polosan. We are very thankful to Lionel Granjon (Gipsa-lab) for his assistance in data preprocessing and analysis. We thank our colleagues from Gipsa-lab, Coriandre Vilain, Alain Arnal, and Christophe Savariaux, for technical help. We also thank Monica Baciu, Stéphane Rousset (LPNC, Grenoble), and Jean-Luc Schwartz (Gipsa-lab) for helpful advice.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access