Left Lateralized Enhancement of Orofacial Somatosensory Processing Due to Speech Sounds PurposeSomatosensory information associated with speech articulatory movements affects the perception of speech sounds and vice versa, suggesting an intimate linkage between speech production and perception systems. However, it is unclear which cortical processes are involved in the interaction between speech sounds and orofacial somatosensory inputs. The authors examined whether speech ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2013
Left Lateralized Enhancement of Orofacial Somatosensory Processing Due to Speech Sounds
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Takayuki Ito
    Haskins Laboratories, New Haven, CT
  • Alexis R. Johns
    Haskins Laboratories, New Haven, CT
  • David J. Ostry
    Haskins Laboratories, New Haven, CT
  • Disclosure:The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure:The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Takayuki Ito: taka@haskins.yale.edu
  • Editor: Jody Kreiman
    Editor: Jody Kreiman×
  • Associate Editor: Michael Hammer
    Associate Editor: Michael Hammer×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Supplement
Research Article   |   December 01, 2013
Left Lateralized Enhancement of Orofacial Somatosensory Processing Due to Speech Sounds
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2013, Vol. 56, S1875-S1881. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2013/12-0226)
History: Received July 13, 2012 , Revised December 12, 2012 , Accepted February 13, 2013
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2013, Vol. 56, S1875-S1881. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2013/12-0226)
History: Received July 13, 2012; Revised December 12, 2012; Accepted February 13, 2013

PurposeSomatosensory information associated with speech articulatory movements affects the perception of speech sounds and vice versa, suggesting an intimate linkage between speech production and perception systems. However, it is unclear which cortical processes are involved in the interaction between speech sounds and orofacial somatosensory inputs. The authors examined whether speech sounds modify orofacial somatosensory cortical potentials that were elicited using facial skin perturbations.

MethodSomatosensory event-related potentials in EEG were recorded in 3 background sound conditions (pink noise, speech sounds, and nonspeech sounds) and also in a silent condition. Facial skin deformations that are similar in timing and duration to those experienced in speech production were used for somatosensory stimulation.

ResultsThe authors found that speech sounds reliably enhanced the first negative peak of the somatosensory event-related potential when compared with the other 3 sound conditions. The enhancement was evident at electrode locations above the left motor and premotor area of the orofacial system. The result indicates that speech sounds interact with somatosensory cortical processes that are produced by speech-production-like patterns of facial skin stretch.

ConclusionNeural circuits in the left hemisphere, presumably in left motor and premotor cortex, may play a prominent role in the interaction between auditory inputs and speech-relevant somatosensory processing.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grants R03DC009064 and R01DC012502. We thank Vincent L. Gracco for advice on experimental procedure and Joshua H. Coppola for data processing.
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