Afferent and Efferent Aspects of Mandibular Sensorimotor Control in Adults Who Stutter PurposeIndividuals who stutter show sensorimotor deficiencies in speech and nonspeech movements. For the mandibular system, the authors dissociated the sense of kinesthesia from the efferent control component to examine whether kinesthetic integrity itself is compromised in stuttering or whether deficiencies occur only when generating motor commands.MethodThe authors investigated 11 stuttering ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2013
Afferent and Efferent Aspects of Mandibular Sensorimotor Control in Adults Who Stutter
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ayoub Daliri
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Roman A. Prokopenko
    Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow
  • Ludo Max
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Disclosure:The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure:The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Ludo Max: ludomax@uw.edu
  • Editor: Jody Kreiman
    Editor: Jody Kreiman×
  • Associate Editor: Hans-Georg Bosshardt
    Associate Editor: Hans-Georg Bosshardt×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Research Article
Research Article   |   December 01, 2013
Afferent and Efferent Aspects of Mandibular Sensorimotor Control in Adults Who Stutter
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2013, Vol. 56, 1774-1788. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2013/12-0134)
History: Received April 19, 2012 , Revised October 22, 2012 , Accepted April 26, 2013
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2013, Vol. 56, 1774-1788. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2013/12-0134)
History: Received April 19, 2012; Revised October 22, 2012; Accepted April 26, 2013
Web of Science® Times Cited: 3

PurposeIndividuals who stutter show sensorimotor deficiencies in speech and nonspeech movements. For the mandibular system, the authors dissociated the sense of kinesthesia from the efferent control component to examine whether kinesthetic integrity itself is compromised in stuttering or whether deficiencies occur only when generating motor commands.

MethodThe authors investigated 11 stuttering and 11 nonstuttering adults' kinesthetic sensitivity threshold and kinesthetic accuracy for passive jaw movements as well as their minimal displacement threshold and positioning accuracy for active jaw movements. They also investigated the correlation with an anatomical index of jaw size.

ResultsThe groups showed no statistically significant differences on sensory measures for passive jaw movements. Although some stuttering individuals performed more poorly than any nonstuttering participants on the active movement tasks, between-group differences for active movements were not statistically significant. Unlike fluent speakers, however, the stuttering group showed a statistically significant correlation between mandibular size and performance in the active and passive near-threshold tasks.

ConclusionsPreviously reported minimal-movement differences were not replicated. Instead, stuttering individuals' performance varied with anatomical properties. These correlational results are consistent with the hypothesis that stuttering participants generate and perceive movements on the basis of less accurate internal models of the involved neuromechanical systems.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) Grants R01DC007603 and P30DC00466 and from The Patrick and Catherine Weldon Donaghue Medical Research Foundation Grant DF05009. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIDCD, the National Institutes of Health, or The Patrick and Catherine Weldon Donaghue Medical Research Foundation.
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