Nasal and Oral Inspiration During Natural Speech Breathing Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the typical pattern for inspiration during speech breathing in healthy adults, as well as the factors that might influence it. Method Ten healthy adults, 18–45 years of age, performed a variety of speaking tasks while nasal ram pressure, audio, and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2014
Nasal and Oral Inspiration During Natural Speech Breathing
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rosemary A. Lester
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Jeannette D. Hoit
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Rosemary A. Lester: ralester@email.arizona.edu
  • Editor: Jody Kreiman
    Editor: Jody Kreiman×
  • Associate Editor: Preeti Sivasankar
    Associate Editor: Preeti Sivasankar×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2014
Nasal and Oral Inspiration During Natural Speech Breathing
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2014, Vol. 57, 734-742. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2013/13-0096)
History: Received April 15, 2013 , Revised July 29, 2013 , Accepted August 30, 2013
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2014, Vol. 57, 734-742. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2013/13-0096)
History: Received April 15, 2013; Revised July 29, 2013; Accepted August 30, 2013

Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the typical pattern for inspiration during speech breathing in healthy adults, as well as the factors that might influence it.

Method Ten healthy adults, 18–45 years of age, performed a variety of speaking tasks while nasal ram pressure, audio, and video recordings were obtained. Inspirations were categorized as nasal-only, oral-only, simultaneous nasal and oral, or alternating nasal and oral inspiration. The method was validated using nasal airflow, oral airflow, audio, and video recordings for 2 participants.

Results The predominant pattern was simultaneous nasal and oral inspirations for all speaking tasks. This pattern was not affected either by the nature of the speaking task or by the phonetic context surrounding the inspiration. The validation procedure confirmed that nearly all inspirations during counting and paragraph reading were simultaneous nasal and oral inspirations, whereas for sentence reading, the predominant pattern was alternating nasal and oral inspirations across the 3 phonetic contexts.

Conclusions Healthy adults inspire through both the nose and mouth during natural speech breathing. This pattern of inspiration is likely beneficial in reducing pathway resistance while preserving some of the benefits of nasal breathing.

Acknowledgments
This research was funded by the Thomas J. Hixon Doctoral Fellowship, the Thomas J. Hixon Student Research Award, and National Institutes of Health Grant F31 DC012697. We thank Mark Borgstrom and the University of Arizona Speech Statistics Group for their assistance with the statistical analyses for this study, and Kate Bunton for her advice on an earlier draft of this article.
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