Influence of Embedded Fibers and an Epithelium Layer on the Glottal Closure Pattern in a Physical Vocal Fold Model PurposeThe purpose of this study was to explore the possible structural and material property features that may facilitate complete glottal closure in an otherwise isotropic physical vocal fold model.MethodSeven vocal fold models with different structural features were used in this study. An isotropic model was used as the baseline model, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 2014
Influence of Embedded Fibers and an Epithelium Layer on the Glottal Closure Pattern in a Physical Vocal Fold Model
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Yue Xuan
    University of California, Los Angeles School of Medicine
  • Zhaoyan Zhang
    University of California, Los Angeles School of Medicine
  • Disclosure:The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication
    Disclosure:The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication×
  • Correspondence to Zhaoyan Zhang: zyzhang@ucla.edu
  • Editor: Rhea Paul
    Editor: Rhea Paul×
  • Associate Editor: Scott Thomson
    Associate Editor: Scott Thomson×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech
Research Article   |   April 01, 2014
Influence of Embedded Fibers and an Epithelium Layer on the Glottal Closure Pattern in a Physical Vocal Fold Model
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2014, Vol. 57, 416-425. doi:10.1044/2013_JSLHR-S-13-0068
History: Received March 20, 2013 , Revised May 28, 2013 , Accepted August 12, 2013
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2014, Vol. 57, 416-425. doi:10.1044/2013_JSLHR-S-13-0068
History: Received March 20, 2013; Revised May 28, 2013; Accepted August 12, 2013
Web of Science® Times Cited: 7

PurposeThe purpose of this study was to explore the possible structural and material property features that may facilitate complete glottal closure in an otherwise isotropic physical vocal fold model.

MethodSeven vocal fold models with different structural features were used in this study. An isotropic model was used as the baseline model, and other models were modified from the baseline model by either embedding fibers aligned along the anterior–posterior direction in the body or cover layer, adding a stiffer outer layer simulating the epithelium layer, or a combination of the 2 features. Phonation tests were performed with both aerodynamic and acoustic measurements and high-speed imaging of vocal fold vibration.

ResultsCompared with the isotropic one-layer model, the presence of a stiffer epithelium layer led to complete glottal closure along the anterior–posterior direction and strong excitation of high-order harmonics in the resulting acoustic spectra. Similar improvements were observed with fibers embedded in the cover layer, but to a lesser degree. The presence of fibers in the body layer did not yield noticeable improvements in glottal closure or harmonic excitation.

ConclusionThis study shows that the presence of collagen and elastin fibers and the epithelium layer may play a critical role in achieving complete glottal closure.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grants R01 DC011299 and R01DC009229, awarded to the second author. Portions of this work were presented at the 165th meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, Montreal, Canada, June 2013.
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