Increase in Speech Recognition due to Linguistic Mismatch Between Target and Masker Speech: Monolingual and Simultaneous Bilingual Performance Purpose To examine whether improved speech recognition during linguistically mismatched target–masker experiments is due to linguistic unfamiliarity of the masker speech or linguistic dissimilarity between the target and masker speech. Method Monolingual English speakers (n = 20) and English–Greek simultaneous bilinguals (n = 20) listened to English sentences in ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2014
Increase in Speech Recognition due to Linguistic Mismatch Between Target and Masker Speech: Monolingual and Simultaneous Bilingual Performance
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lauren Calandruccio
    Queens College of the City University of New York
  • Haibo Zhou
    Department of Biostatistics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Lauren Calandruccio: Lauren_Calandruccio@med.unc.edu
  • Lauren Calandruccio is currently affiliated with Department of Allied Health Sciences, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Editor: Craig Champlin
    Lauren Calandruccio is currently affiliated with Department of Allied Health Sciences, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Editor: Craig Champlin×
  • Associate Editor: Deborah von Hapsburg
    Associate Editor: Deborah von Hapsburg×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2014
Increase in Speech Recognition due to Linguistic Mismatch Between Target and Masker Speech: Monolingual and Simultaneous Bilingual Performance
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2014, Vol. 57, 1089-1097. doi:10.1044/2013_JSLHR-H-12-0378
History: Received November 27, 2012 , Revised March 22, 2013 , Accepted September 12, 2013
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2014, Vol. 57, 1089-1097. doi:10.1044/2013_JSLHR-H-12-0378
History: Received November 27, 2012; Revised March 22, 2013; Accepted September 12, 2013
Web of Science® Times Cited: 9

Purpose To examine whether improved speech recognition during linguistically mismatched target–masker experiments is due to linguistic unfamiliarity of the masker speech or linguistic dissimilarity between the target and masker speech.

Method Monolingual English speakers (n = 20) and English–Greek simultaneous bilinguals (n = 20) listened to English sentences in the presence of competing English and Greek speech. Data were analyzed using mixed-effects regression models to determine differences in English recogition performance between the 2 groups and 2 masker conditions.

Results Results indicated that English sentence recognition for monolinguals and simultaneous English–Greek bilinguals improved when the masker speech changed from competing English to competing Greek speech.

Conclusion The improvement in speech recognition that has been observed for linguistically mismatched target–masker experiments cannot be simply explained by the masker language being linguistically unknown or unfamiliar to the listeners. Listeners can improve their speech recognition in linguistically mismatched target–masker experiments even when the listener is able to obtain meaningful linguistic information from the masker speech.

Acknowledgments
Partial support was provided by National Institutes of Health Grants R01ES021900, UL1RR025747, and P01CA142538, awarded to Haibo Zhou. This project could not have been completed without the dedication of Anastasia (Natasha) Pashalis. We are also grateful to all of the research assistants in the Speech and Auditory Research Laboratory at Queens College, especially Rosemarie Ott, Jennifer Weintraub, Evangelia Tsirinkis, and Michelle D'Alleva.
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